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Motorola T720 review: Motorola T720

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The Good MMS-ready for photo messaging; works on GPRS networks; downloads apps/ring tones; nice keypad; external LCD; changeable faceplates.

The Bad Could have a better color display; GSM coverage still spotty in the United States.

The Bottom Line The T722i picks up where the T720 left off, but we wish it had a better color display.

Visit manufacturer site for details.

7.0 Overall
  • Design 7.0
  • Features 7.0
  • Performance 7.0

Review Sections

Review summary

The T722i is a cross between two of Motorola's most popular models to date: the slick V60 series and the recent T720. The result is a phone that's sexy, functional, and reliable. Add to the mix the latest in features, such as MMS messaging, downloadable apps, and compatibility with GPRS networks, and it's clear that this phone can compete well with others in T-Mobile's lineup. But before you take the plunge, make sure you have sufficient GSM coverage in your area. At first glance, with a black Star Trek-like emblem and a rectangular external LCD, the T722i looks a lot like a Motorola V60 on steroids. If you don't like the shade, opt for changeable front and back faceplates. But once you open up the shiny cover, you'll note that the phone is all T720. It has a similar spacious, nine-line, 4,096-color display--that's hard to view in direct sunlight--and comparable dimensions (3.5 by 1.9 by 1.0 inches; 3.9 ounces), which means it feels comfortable in the hand and won't leave a bulge in your pocket.

As mentioned, like the T720 before it, the T722i sports an external LCD that shows the time, the date, network strength, battery status, and caller ID (when available). But it's the mobile's icon-heavy user interface that really draws you in. With one-touch access to four programmable shortcuts and the phone book, this is one of the more intuitive menu interfaces we've encountered.

We also appreciated the large, backlit keypad, which keeps misdials to a minimum. Additionally, the four-way navigation key and the three keys placed above it add to the phone's ease of use. If you plan to play a lot of games on your phone, you should check out a model with a joysticklike navigation key, such as the Sony Ericsson T616. We should note, also, that the phone's sweet spot is rather small, so you'll need to line up the T722i's ear- and mouthpieces to get the best performance. Rich in features, the T722i comes with all the usual suspects, including a 500-name phone book, a calendar, a calculator, a currency converter, two-way text and MMS messaging, voice notes and tags, caller ID, call logs, e911 compatibility, a currency converter, and 70 polyphonic ring tones (33 included, 32 customizable and/or downloadable slots, and 5 vibrating styles).

This mobile is also J2ME enabled, which means you can download new games, screensavers, wallpaper, and applications via the wireless Web to the phone's 1.75MB of dedicated memory.

You can even turn the phone into a low-res digital camera when you purchase the optional digital camera accessory. On top of that, the T722i is data ready and compatible with T-Mobile's next-generation GPRS network. In our tests using T-Mobile service in San Francisco and the surrounding Bay Area, the single-mode (GSM 1900) mobile typically got good reception. Occasionally, we experienced dropped calls for no apparent reason. Callers sounded loud and clear, and for their part, they couldn't tell we were using a cell phone. We should note, however, that the GSM networks are still expanding in the United States; before buying this phone, it's best to make sure that you have sufficient coverage everywhere you want to make a call.

The phone performed well in our battery-life test. We surpassed the 210-minute talk time by more than 100 minutes, with an impressive 5 hours, 16 minutes of talk time. We also managed to get close to a week of standby time (it's rated at 120 hours). This is much better than its predecessor, the T720.

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