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LG Hom-Bot Square Robotic Vacuum review:

LG's robot vacuum can't keep up with the competition

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The Good The LG Hom-Bot Square is one of the quietest robot vacuums we've tested, and it offers a variety of cleaning modes to choose from. Battery life is also decent.

The Bad The Hom-Bot was beaten soundly in our cleaning tests by just about every other robot vacuum we've tested. It also finished in a virtual tie with an underachieving Hom-Bot model we reviewed three years ago.

The Bottom Line It's a competent cleaner, but the LG Hom-Bot Square lags far behind less expensive Neato and Roomba models. We recommend sticking with those.

Visit manufacturer site for details.

CNET Editors' Rating

6.2 Overall
  • Performance 5.0
  • Usability 6.0
  • Design 8.0
  • Features 7.0

Right here at the top, I'm going to refer you to my review of the LG Hom-Bot Square from three years ago. I like that review, and not just because I was able to sneak a "Breaking Bad" analogy into the intro -- it was one of the very first products I ever tested for CNET.

But that's not why I'm pointing you back to 2013. The real reason is because this new 2016 version of the Hom-Bot Square is essentially the exact same product as the overpriced and rather unremarkable cleaner I wrote about back then. It looks the same, its features are the same, it navigates the same and it cleans the same, which is to say not as well as the competition. The only real changes are a new coat of paint and a new Swiffer-like mopping attachment you can stick onto the bottom.

At $900 (or AU$1,000 in Australia, where it's called the "Roboking"; similar models sell in the UK, as well), this new Hom-Bot model is one of the most expensive yet -- and more expensive than competitors from Roomba and Neato that are flat-out better. I say don't get sucked in (or, at least wait until the app-enabled Hom-Bot we saw at CES arrives, hopefully later this year).

Vacuum versatility

The Hom-Bot offers a variety of different features and cleaning modes.

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

The Hom-Bot's chief strong suit is that it offers several different cleaning modes. The default is "Zig-Zag Mode," which sets it sweeping back and forth across your floors. But there's also a "Spiral Spot" mode and a "Cell-by-Cell mode," which has vacuum break your floorspace into sections before focusing on them one at a time. At all three settings, you can turn on an additional "Turbo Mode" that'll have it work a little harder at the expense of battery life. You can also set it out in "Repeat Mode" in which it will continuously clean your floors until the battery needs charging, or schedule cleaning runs that start at a specific time.

You can also drive the cleaner around like a toy car using the handy remote. This comes into play with "Myspace Mode," where you steer the Hom-Bot around a perimeter, then tell it to clean within those bounds -- though I suspect that most people will use the manual controls to chase their pets, instead.

That's a lot of options, but keep in mind that not one of them is new. It's the exact same set of features we saw back in 2013, right down to the vacuum's robotic voice and the cheerful little tune that it chirps out whenever it's done with a run (and yep, there's still a mute button, too).

There is a new Swiffer-like dry-mopping attachment that you can clip onto the Hom-Bot's undercarriage. It wasn't bad at pushing dust and pet hair around on hardwood floors, but its use is pretty limited with no internal reservoir for water or cleaner fluid. In fact, the vacuum doesn't do anything different than before to put the mopping attachment to work. There isn't even a mopping-specific cleaning mode. Given that this is the Hom-Bot's only new cleaning feature to speak of, it's a bit like putting new seat covers in a car from 2013 and then calling it a 2016 model.

lg-hom-bot-rice-mid-pile-carpet.jpg
Ry Crist/CNET

Cleaning performance

Of course, you might forgive such a vehicle if the manufacturer had at least given the engine an upgrade. That was my hope as I began my performance tests in which we measure the cleaning power and navigational smarts of each robot vacuum we review.

We test three different kinds of debris (rice, pet hair and sand) on three different surfaces (a plushy midpile carpet, a rough-textured low-pile carpet and hardwood floors). After each run, we weigh what the vacuum picked up, then reset everything and test again. We do at least three runs for each kind of debris on each kind of surface, plus additional anecdotal runs to test things like the position of the base station, the additional cleaning modes and how well it navigates through a full-size, furnished living space (in this case, the CNET Smart Home).

Rice (average amount picked up out of 2.50 oz.)

Neato Botvac Connected
2.48
2.45
2.50
Neato Botvac 85
2.45
2.38
2.45
iRobot Roomba 880
2.38
2.43
2.33
Neato Botvac D85
2.44
2.22
2.38
iRobot Roomba 980
2.42
2.29
2.13
Samsung Powerbot VR9000
2.33
2.23
2.28
Neato XV Signature Pro
2.05
2.33
2.13
LG Hom-Bot Square (2016)
1.90
1.93
2.15
LG Hom-Bot Square (2013)
1.85
1.87
2.13

Legend:

Midpile carpet
Low-pile carpet
Hardwood floor

Note:

Longer bars indicates better performance

The Hom-Bot wasn't bad at picking up rice, but missing entire patches of our test floor brought the numbers down.

Ry Crist/CNET

We started with rice, typically the easiest test for our robot vacuums. The Hom-Bot did a decent job of picking the stuff up, but it did a less than stellar job at navigating across the entirety of our test surfaces. In one test, it essentially missed the entire left side of the pen. In another, it never worked its way into the back corners.

Mediocre cleaning power compounded the problem, especially on carpets. In addition to missing spots, the Hom-Bot wasn't able to pick up all of the rice in spots that it didn't miss. Competitors like the Neato Botvac Connected and the iRobot Roomba 880 did far, far better in the same tests.

It wasn't until I was finished with all of my tests that I went back to check how the 2016 Hom-Bot stacked up against the 2013 model. I was astonished by how close the numbers were -- just a 2 percent increase in the amount of rice it collected on carpets and a 1 percent increase on hardwood. So much for that fancy new engine.

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