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Christmas Gift Guide

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

Garmin Fenix Chronos

The Fenix Chronos is like no other Garmin device before it

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The watch comes packaged in a premium wood box.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

Sliding the cover off reveals the stunning watch.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

This is the Fenix Chronos Titanium model. It features a titanium casing and brushed titanium band. It looks great, but it's expensive, costing $1,500.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

There's also a stainless steel model that can be paired with a leather strap ($900) or 316L stainless steel band ($1,000).

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

In addition to the watch, the box contains an instruction manual, charging cable and a second silicone watch strap.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The Chronos is quite stunning. It features a 1.2-inch always-on display that is protected by ultra-durable sapphire crystal glass.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

On the back sits an optical heart-rate sensor.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The Chronos has an omni-directional GPS and GLONASS antenna for tracking a variety of different activities, including running, biking, swimming, triathlons, hiking, climbing, skiing, rowing, paddle boarding and golfing.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

Other features include all-day activity tracking for things like steps, distance, calories burned, sleep and heart-rate, as well as smartphone notifications when connected to an iPhone or Android phone.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

It also includes an altimeter, barometer and compass, and is waterproof up to 100 meters (about 328 feet).

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

A long press on the top right button jumps right into the tachymeter, which you can use to manually measure speed.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The watch is essentially a Fenix 3 HR in a slimmer and more premium shell, although the Chronos has some differences.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The optical heart-rate sensor on the back doesn't bulge out as much, which makes it a little more comfortable to wear.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

But the Chronos doesn't include Wi-Fi and instead relies solely on Bluetooth to upload data.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

It also a has a smaller battery compared to the Fenix 3 HR (180mAh vs. 300mAh).

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The Chronos will last up to 13 hours with an active GPS signal (3 hours less than the Fenix 3 HR) and up to a week as a watch and activity tracker.

A special UltraTrac mode will extend battery life to 25 hours when using GPS, but it disables the heart rate sensor and reduces how often the GPS is pinging the satellite.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

You're trading style for performance with Chronos when it comes to battery.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The Chronos is quite stunning and I've really enjoyed wearing it the past few days. It has all of the features that you could ever need for training, competing or walking around town. And it doesn't look like a normal sport watch.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

It doesn't do anything new, but if you put a premium on design and have some extra cash laying around, the watch has everything a budding athlete with a large checking account could ask for.

Learn more about the Fenix Chronos in our hands-on post.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

Here you can see the Chronos (left) next to the Fenix 3 HR (right).

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
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