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Christmas Gift Guide

Klipsch Image S5i Rugged

Samsung Galaxy S 4G (T-Mobile)

Sennheiser HD 598

XCom Global MiFi Hotspot

Motorola Xoom tablet

Sony Vaio VPC-YB15KX/S

Motorola ES400S (Sprint)

Gateway SX2851-41

Motorola Brute i686 - graphite (Sprint Nextel)

Sonim XP3300 Force (black)

Here's our weekly roundup of the new products CNET reviewers liked best.

Klipsch Image S5i Rugged

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: The Klipsch Image S5i Rugged earphones feature a durable, water-resistant design, and the in-line remote's buttons are large enough to be operated by gloved hands. The earphones provide thumping bass and solid overall audio. Includes a hard-sided case with an integrated flashlight.

The bad: The Klipsch Image S5i earphones don't offer the most secure fit, since the remote adds weight and there are no ear loops.

The bottom line: For the skier, snowboarder, or skater who doesn't have a helmet with headphones built in, the Klipsch Image S5i Rugged earphones are the next best thing.

Read CNET's full review
Starting at: $129.00 from 6 stores

Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET

Samsung Galaxy S 4G (T-Mobile)

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: The Samsung Galaxy S 4G has 4G connectivity, a front-facing camera for video calls, and a larger battery. Android 2.2 offers impressive data speeds and good call quality. Other highlights include a rich and vibrant Super AMOLED touch screen and a 5-megapixel camera with 720p HD video recording.

The bad: No camera flash. The Galaxy S 4G has less internal memory than the Vibrant. There was some slight sluggishness with some tasks.

The bottom line:The Samsung Galaxy S 4G is a fantastic Android smartphone for T-Mobile customers, delivering fast data speeds and other improvements, but Vibrant owners should be fine holding off for now.

Read CNET's full review
Pricing is not available from any of our online merchants.

Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET

Sennheiser HD 598

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: Lightweight German design is extremely comfortable; highly dynamic and detailed sound; 3.5mm headphone plug adapter.

The bad: No storage case included.

The bottom line: The new HD 598's "wow" styling updates the classic Sennheiser look, and the sound has more detail and higher resolution than previous models. We recommend these cans to anyone looking for a pair of headphones with precision sound quality and a wide-open soundstage.

Read CNET's full review
Starting at: $249.88 from 4 stores

Caption by / Photo by Sennheiser

XCom Global MiFi Hotspot

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: The XCom Global MiFi Hotspot has a compact, straightforward design. It offers dependable and fast Internet coverage and the rental plans include unlimited data use.

The bad: The XCom Global MiFi Hotspot can't cover multiple countries with one device. The rental service can be expensive given the multiple extra fees.

The bottom line:The XCom Global MiFi Hotspot is pricey, but if you need reliable Internet coverage abroad, the cost will be worth it.

Read CNET's full review
Pricing is not available from any of our online merchants.

Caption by / Photo by XCom

Motorola Xoom tablet

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: With Google's next generation of Android, Motorola's knack for great hardware, and Verizon's promise of 4G network compatibility, the Xoom tablet technically offers a more powerful, more capable alternative to Apple's iPad.

The bad:It's expensive, slightly heftier than the iPad, and novice users may balk at Android 3.0's read-the-manual attitude. Adobe Flash not yet supported.

The bottom line:The Xoom's spec sheet is enough to make any tablet tremble, but the price is high, and Google still has some work to do before its tablet software experience is as fleshed out and intuitive as Apple's.

Read CNET's full review
Starting at: $600

Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET

Sony Vaio VPC-YB15KX/S

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: Uses AMD's excellent new Fusion CPU/GPU platform; sharp Vaio design; large hard drive.

The bad: More expensive than other AMD Fusion systems; limited configurations; some keyboard and touch pad compromises.

The bottom line: Sony ditches the Netbook for this more upscale AMD-powered ultraportable, with good performance and features, but also an upscale price.

Read CNET's full review
Starting at: $549.99 from 4 stores

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

Motorola ES400S (Sprint)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: The Motorola ES400S is a business-centric phone with a rugged exterior, a biometric fingerprint sensor, a 3.2-megapixel camera, a bar code scanner function, and plenty of enterprise-level applications.

The bad: The Motorola ES400S still runs on Windows Mobile 6.5.3 and its resistive touch screen sometimes requires a stylus for more precision.

The bottom line: The Motorola ES400S is definitely too big and clunky for an average consumer, but mobile task workers might find this a very useful tool for the job.

Read CNET's full review
Price: $549.99 from 1 store

Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET

Gateway SX2851-41

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: Continues Gateway's winning slim tower formula by offering fast, budget performance and living-room capability; friendly looking new design; wireless networking card included.

The bad: New look marred by Intel and Microsoft badges on front of the case; hard to recommend a desktop with Intel's older chips.

The bottom line: Gateway knows how to market a compelling budget slim tower, and the SX2851-41 is no exception. We're wary of buying any new PC right now with an Intel chip refresh on the way, but if you need an affordable desktop for work or living-room duty, this system is a solid pick.

Read CNET's full review
Starting at: $549.99 from 4 stores

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

Motorola Brute i686 - graphite (Sprint Nextel)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good:The Motorola Brute i686 has a very rugged and durable design, plus a decent feature set that includes push-to-talk, GPS, and a 2-megapixel camera. Call quality is very impressive.

The bad:The Motorola Brute i686 is only very slightly different than its predecessor, the Brute i680. There's no external camera shutter button, photo quality is average at best, and we wish there were a 3.5mm headset jack.

The bottom line: The Motorola Brute i686 can take a longer dunk in water but is otherwise identical to the Brute i680. It's not the prettiest phone on the block, but it's incredibly durable, with great call quality to boot.

Read CNET's full review
Starting at: $289.53 from 3 stores

Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET

Sonim XP3300 Force (black)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: The Sonim XP3300 Force has added strong call quality, a camera, and more apps to its hallmark ruggedness and durability.

The bad: A small screen, tiny text, and confusing user interface mar the user experience on the Sonim XP3300 Force. The dial pad is too cramped for large hands wearing worker's gloves. It's also rather costly.

The bottom line: Despite some design flaws, Sonim's new XP3300 Force is a cut above previous rugged models.

Read CNET's full review
Pricing is not available from any of our online merchants.

Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
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