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Zero Latency, the world's largest virtual reality attraction, is set to open its doors open August 15 in North Melbourne, Australia, but we've been offered an early peek.

Here, we see the game master’s station, where an operator can see the virtual world within and also pause it in case things get a little hectic.

Caption by / Photo by Bennett Ring/CNET

The team used a 3D printer for some components, but when it comes to making rugged assault rifles, nothing beats the ShopBot CNC mill tucked away in the workshop.

Caption by / Photo by Bennett Ring/CNET

All 400 square metres (about 4,300 square feet) of the play space. At night, the area is kept dark, as the optical tracking system works better without ambient light.

Caption by / Photo by Bennett Ring/CNET

The directors of Zero Latency, from left to right: Tim Ruse, Kyel Smith, Scott Vandonkelaar, James De Colling and Hunter Mayne.

Caption by / Photo by Bennett Ring/CNET

Each player wears one of these 2.5kg (5pd) backpacks, which includes a chopped-down Alienware Alpha PC, battery, DK2 HMD, gaming headphones and a microphone for voice communication.

Caption by / Photo by Bennett Ring/CNET

The top of each backpack shows just how many devices plug into each Alienware Alpha.

Caption by / Photo by Bennett Ring/CNET

The assault rifle has buttons for reloading and firing mode, as well as a pump action for special rounds such as grenades.

Caption by / Photo by Bennett Ring/CNET

Each gun is tracked as a separate entity, which means players can even swap weapons if they so choose, or double up for a killer Akimbo mode.

Caption by / Photo by Bennett Ring/CNET

Off-the-shelf Sony PlayStation Eye cameras handle the optical tracking, and they’re arranged in rings to capture a full 360-degree view.

Caption by / Photo by Bennett Ring/CNET
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