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Spyscape

Spyscape is a new museum dedicated to the history and practice of espionage. It opened in 2018 in New York.

CNET's Iyaz Akhtar took the tour featuring surveillance, encryption, hacking and spy service lore.

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This modern facility includes displays of spying technology and artifacts from years past, as well as an interactive set of experiences.

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Tickets start at $39 for adults (roughly £28 and AU$50) and $32 (roughly £23 and AU$42) for children. What's inside? Take a look with us!

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If you complete a personality test designed by the former head of recruitment for MI5 -- the British domestic security service that's roughly equivalent to the FBI -- and participate in a number of the interactive challenges, you can find out "what kind of spy you'd be."

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You'll start your journey in what is now the largest elevator in New York, according to staff. As you ride upstairs you'll watch an introductory film projected on its walls.

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There are numerous "Question Stations" throughout the museum, offering tests in personality, risk and brainpower.

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Iyaz gets started on the personality test. Do you agree or disagree that you'd "say anything to get what you want?"

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The Hall of Encryption should be interesting!

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Inside there are numerous encryption and code-breaking machines. This is the Typex, a British encryption device that dates back to the 1930s. 

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Say hello to the Bombe, the machine that decoded the German Enigma cipher thought to be uncrackable. Operating out of the Bletchley Park facility (as seen in the film The Imitation Game), it was a key factor in the covert war against the Nazis. 

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For the encryption challenge, Iyaz had to quickly swap letters on this touchscreen to send messages to a colleague in need of rescue.

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Next up: lie detectors. This early model dates from the 1950s!

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Oooh, so 80s!

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Here we see a current lie detector setup. Might be more effective but the one from the 80s looked way cooler.

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Time for an interactive deception challenge!

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In this booth, Iyaz was trained and tested in his ability to detect when someone is lying!

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More cool spy tech: This is the Fialka, the Soviet equivalent of the Enigma cipher machine.

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These are Cold War-era cipher machines. The Hagelin CX-52, on the right, and the "pocket version," the CD-57 on the left.

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This field version of the "US Enigma" machine was intended for battlefield use only. That's because the Germans could break the encryption from this baby within 4 hours, according to the museum.

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Let's see what's inside the Surveillance Hall.

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The recent Edward Snowden affair has already entered the history books. 

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This so-called "Snowbot" is a telepresence robot used by Edward Snowden to remotely attend conferences from Russia, where he's been granted asylum. He's charged with espionage in the US. 

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Check out these tiny secret spy cameras!

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Bug sweepers like these can help the paranoid detect listening devices that have been planted in their surroundings.

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Here we see Iyaz taking the surveillance challenge, where he had to follow instructions and quickly identify activity happening in a vast array of surveillance footage projected above us.

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Onward to the Hacking wing!

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Anonymous and other well-known hacker groups -- and individuals -- are given their due here.

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For example, this wall display teaches visitors about Stuxnet, the "first weapon to be made entirely out of code." The digital worm which afflicted the Iranian nuclear program is believed to be of US/Israeli origin. 

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The Stuxnet worm is said to have been brought into Iran on flash drives. The drive shown here is said to actually contain the malicious code.

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Next up is a Special Ops challenge!

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I can haz lasers?!

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Iyaz speeds through this tunnel, dodging laser beams and hitting as many of the lit buttons as he could in a race against time.

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Final score 124. It must be good: Our tour guide seemed impressed!

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More historical spy tech along the route! Check out this suitcase radio from the 1940s.

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This is a high resolution camera from a spy plane that was flown over Cuba in 1956.

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More spy gear from the days of old!

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Check out the travel size recorder on the left. Apparently it was so good that the CIA, KGB and Stasi all used it. 

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At the end of our tour, Iyaz was able to get his spy test results!

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He'd be best suited for Special Ops... watch out for this guy!

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You'll exit through the gift shop.

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There's a pretty fun array of spy-related gear here.

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Question everything, indeed. 

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