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Touchdown in Washington

Piccard waves in D.C.

Leaving Cincinnati

Piccard in the cockpit

Runway in Cincinnati

Aviation history

Checking out Solar Impulse

Landing in Cincinnati

Solar Impulse heads to D.C.

Borschberg climbs into the cockpit

Borschberg chats with press

Ground crew performs checks

Solar impulse lands in St. Louis

Piccard after a safe landing

Piccard waves after landing

Stored in an inflatable hangar

Taking off in Dallas

Landing in Dallas

Borschberg arrives in Dallas

Borschberg and Piccard talk with the press

Hanging around in Phoenix

Going to Dallas

Tail of the Solar Impulse

Landing in Phoenix

First leg is over

View from the cockpit

Piccard in the cockpit

The journey begins

Final check

Solar Impulse co-founder and CEO André Borschberg watches as the solar-powered plane touches down at Washington Dulles International Airport.

The Solar Impulse HB-SIA started its journey across America at Moffett Field in Mountain View, Calif., on May 3. On a mission to promote clean technology and renewable energy, the solar-powered plane has made stops in Phoenix, Dallas, St. Louis, and Washington. The fifth and final leg of the flight will end at JFK airport in New York in early July.

In the slideshow that follows, you can look at each leg of the Solar Impulse's flight across America.

Editors' note: This slideshow was first published on June 14, 2013. It was updated later in June with photos of the Solar Impulse's flight from St. Louis to Washington.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Bertrand Piccard, chairman and co-founder of Solar Impulse, waves after completing the fourth leg of the coast-to-coast voyage.

Piccard landed in Washington just after midnight on June 16. It took him more than 14 hours to make the flight from Cincinnati.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Piccard takes off from Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport at 10:11 a.m. ET on June 15.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Piccard sits in the cockpit just before taking off for Washington.

The fourth leg of the journey -- from St. Louis to Washington -- was split into two flights to avoid "strong cross and head winds" that would have slowed down the HB-SIA.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

The ground crew for the Solar Impulse tows the plane onto a runway at the Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport. Takeoff from Cincinnati was slightly delayed because of lingering fog patches over the airport.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Borschberg and Piccard meet Steve Wright (center), the great-grand nephew of the Wright brothers, while in Cincinnati.

Wilbur and Orville Wright, brothers from Dayton, Ohio, built the world's first airplane to make a heavier than air, powered controlled flight. In December of 1903 the Wright Flyer made four flights at Kitty Hawk, N.C., the best of which covered 852 feet in 59 seconds.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Crowds get a chance to check out the Solar Impulse HB-SIA airplane during its short stay in Cincinnati.

The HB-SIA plane has 12,000 solar cells built into its wings that charge lithium batteries. This enables the plane to fly both day and night for up 26 hours at a stretch. It has the wingspan of a large passenger jet, at 208 feet, and the weight of a small car at 3,527 pounds.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch
Borschberg lands in Cincinnati at 8:15 p.m. ET on June 14.
Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

The Solar Impulse takes off from St. Louis early in the morning on June 14 with Borschberg at the controls.

Before heading all the way to Washington, D.C., the plane will make a pit stop at Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport to avoid "challenging weather."

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch
Borschberg took off from Lambert-St.Louis International Airport at 4:01 a.m. CT on Friday. When he completes the roughly 10-hour flight to Cincinnati, pilot and Solar Impulse co-founder Bertrand Piccard will take over for the rest of the leg to Washington.
Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch
Borschberg chats with the press before taking off from St. Louis.
Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch
The ground crew for the Solar Impulse performs checks on the plane Friday morning before the start of the fourth leg of its journey across the U.S.
Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

The Solar Impulse comes in for a smooth landing at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport early in the morning on June 4, finishing up the third leg of its coast-to-coast voyage.

Caption by / Photo by Jean Revillard | Rezo | SolarImpulse | Polaris

Pilot Bertrand Piccard took off from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and was in the air for 21 hours and 21 minutes. It was his longest flight to date.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Piccard, who is also chairman and co-founder of Solar Impulse, waves after landing in St. Louis.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

While in St. Louis the aircraft was stored in an inflatable mobile hanger designed by Solar Impulse for its planned flight around the world in 2015. It was the first time the hanger was used in real conditions.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Borschberg waves goodbye as the Solar Impulse, with Piccard at the controls, takes off for St. Louis. The more than 600-mile flight to St. Louis took Piccard 21 hours and 22 minutes to complete.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Solar Impulse comes in for a landing at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport in Dallas, Texas, on May 23. André Borschberg, Solar Impulse co-founder and CEO, piloted this leg of the cross-country voyage.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

The 936-mile flight, from Phoenix to Dallas, broke the world distance record in the solar aviation category of the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI). It took Borschberg over 18 hours to complete this third leg of the flight across America.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Borschberg (right) and Piccard (center), who are taking turns flying the HB-SIA airplane across the country, speak with the press in Dallas.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Solar Impulse in a hangar in Phoenix before the third leg of the coast-to-coast journey.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Borschberg at the Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport getting ready to fly to Dallas.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

Partners of Solar Impulse -- including Solvay, Schindler, Omega and Deutsche Bank -- are shown on the tail of the HB-SIA airplane. The Solar Impulse project officially launched in 2003. After years of designing and refining, the HB-SIA made the first flight at night in solar aviation history in 2010.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

The Solar Impulse lands at Phoenix’s Sky Harbor International Airport.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Merz | Rezo.ch

Borschberg and Piccard after the Solar Impulse lands in Phoenix.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Merz | Rezo.ch

A view from the cockpit as the Solar Impulse flies from Mountain View, Calif., to Phoenix. The HB-SIA has four pods fixed under its wings, each with a twin-bladed propeller, an electric motor, a polymer lithium battery, and a management system that controls charge and temperature.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse

Piccard in the cockpit of the Solar Impulse during the first leg of the flight.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse

Piccard took off from Moffett Airfield at 6:12 a.m. PT on May 3, officially starting the first leg of the Solar Impulse flight across America. The first leg took more than 18 hours to complete.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Merz | Rezo.ch

Borschberg joins Piccard for a final check before taking off from Moffett Airfield at the Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif.

Caption by / Photo by Solar Impulse | Merz | Rezo.ch
Updated:
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