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Pre-release software license

The technical preview of Microsoft's upcoming office suite isn't set for release until July. But it made its way onto the Web, apparently on Friday.

Sister site ZDNet Australia captured screenshots of the build by installing the leaked preview in a virtualized VMware instance on top of Windows XP Service Pack 3. ZDNet Australia's Renai LeMay could have installed the suite on top of the release candidate of Windows 7, but wanted to see how Office 2010 would work without the latest operating system sitting underneath it.

The answer, it turns out, is "just fine."

Here, you can see a fairly standard Microsoft pre-release software license.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Installation process

The installation process is quite similar to that of Office 2007.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Suite has grown

Office has grown over the years to encompass much more than just the standard suite of Word, Excel, Outlook, and PowerPoint.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Installation time

Installing the suite--with all options selected--took about 10 minutes.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Updates

Like Office 2007, Office 2010 updates will eventually be available through Office Online, Microsoft's support site.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Come a long way

The starting animation for each application is suitably flashy for a new release. Office has come a long way since the late 1990s.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Word

Word looks superficially similar to Word 2007...

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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More to Word

...but there are some deeper changes under the hood. This open/save/print screen reappears throughout Office 2010. Its layout is logical and easy to get used to.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Most options remain

Most of the options from previous versions of Office have returned.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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New document

Creating a new document in Word 2010.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Printing

Printing a document.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Sharing options

Multiple options for sharing content with colleagues and friends.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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More options

Some deeper options for the suite as a whole.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Minimalist look

This yellow button allows you to hide the Office 2010 ribbon completely, for a minimalist look.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Positive feedback

Microsoft encourages you to let it know how Office 2010 is treating you well...

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Negative feedback

...or badly.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Outlook

Outlook 2010 feels like an e-mail software done right--slick and smooth.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Navigation window

Here's that navigation window again, this time in a deep orange.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Outlook options

Choosing Outlook options.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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New e-mail

Creating a new e-mail.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Navigation box

The navigation box pops up for settings for individual e-mails.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Full suite

The full suite when installed.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Excel

Microsoft Excel looks fairly similar to the 2007 version but, again, there are some navigation changes under the hood.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Excel in green

Excel's green color scheme.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Template

Creating a new document, including from a template.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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PowerPoint

PowerPoint 2010, now in an orange color--not the same orange as Outlook, however.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Navigation interface

The same navigation interface reappears. It gives a feel for how Office 2010 is unified.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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Presentation

Creating a new presentation.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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OneNote

OneNote receives the pink treatment.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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OneNote again

Or is it a deep purple?

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshots by Renai LeMay/ZDNet Australia
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