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Overview

Side view

Corner detail

Stand

Inputs

3D glasses not included

Remote

Main Apps page

Apps menu sorting

Yahoo widgets

Facebook App

Samsung TV support app

Main picture menu

Film mode settings

3D menu

2D picture quality

As the least-expensive plasma TV for 2010 to feature 3D compatibility, the Samsung PNC7000 series will strike a chord of interest with those who care both about the picture quality advantages of plasma over LCD--such as improved uniformity and off-angle viewing--and about that much-hyped third dimension. And judging from the four 3D models we've reviewed, plasma provides a significant advantage over LCD for 3D picture quality, too. That said, the excellent overall 2D image on the Samsung PNC7000 series is what matters most to us, despite a few niggles that keep it from the very top of the class. A comprehensive feature set and slick, slim styling sweeten the deal even further, making the PNC7000 one of the most impressive plasmas we've seen so far.
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This is what 1.4 inches deep looks like.
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A transparent edge and a matte finish distinguish the PNC7000's frame.
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A transparent swivel stand stalk separates the brushed metal of the base from the panel.
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The slim panel necessitates a cramped input section. Four HDMI are onboard, but only one component-video input.
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Samsung's compatible 3D glasses, model SG-2100AB, cost about $150 per pair. You can also opt for the 3D starter kit, with two pairs of glasses and a movie, if you buy a Samsung 3D Blu-ray player.
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We don't like the new grid layout as much as the better-differentiated cursor keys on last year's remotes, but at least that fingerprint-magnet finish is gone.
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Hulu Plus headlines an excellent selection of streaming Apps.
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In addition to the iPhone-like default tile view for Apps, you can easily sort them by category.
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In addition to the Apps interface, a separate one is available for Yahoo widgets. We find the presence of both somewhat confusing.
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Samsung whipped up its own Facebook app to go with the existing Yahoo widget. For some reason, the TV offers both.
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One custom app offers support videos and features demos for numerous Samsung products.
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We're still fans of Samsung's menu design.
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A few options exist to combat burn-in.
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Unlike some other Samsung plasmas, the PNC7000 series lacks an option for 1080p/24 compatibility.
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Samsung offers a few 3D options in the menu.
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
All told, the PNC7000 provided excellent picture quality with 2D sources, evincing deep black levels and relatively accurate color. It lacks the 1080p/24 processing, inky blacks, and spot-on color of some high-end TVs, but it showed no major issues in our tests, and delivered the uniformity and off-angle prowess we expect from plasma.
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
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