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Ready! Set! Go!

Samsung launched its not-a-Micro Four Thirds camera, the NX10, at Sydney's Taronga Zoo this week. We were there to give this small, interchangeable lens camera with an APS-C CMOS sensor a good going over.

A snake gets up close and personal with the NX10.

The now-on-sale NX10 is like the Olympus E-P1 and Panasonic G-series in that it uses interchangeable lenses like a full-size dSLR, but does so without the mirror box and pentaprism, meaning that it's smaller than a dSLR.

Unlike the Olympus and Panasonic cameras, the NX10 features an APS-C sensor — the same size sensor that's found in the leviathan Canon EOS 7D.

The APS-C sensor means that NX has to use proprietary Samsung lenses. At launch three will be available: an 18-55mm, a 30mm pancake and a 50-200mm zoom.

Editor's note: All photos in this gallery are shot with the Samsung NX10, with editing limited to cropping and shrinking. Colours, sharpness and all other settings have been left untouched.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Burst mode comparison

The NX10 has a 30fps burst mode. Beware, though, that resolution drops from 14.6-megapixel (4592x3056) to 1.4 (1472x976).

The top image was shot at full resolution on superfine quality. The bottom shot was shot in burst mode, at the greatly reduced resolution and with a noticeable moire effect on the zookeeper's shirt.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Burst mode

While image quality suffers in burst mode, it'll please those that never grew out of the flip-book craze at school.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Stunning screen

The NX10's main marketing points may be its petite dimensions, interchangeable lenses and APS-C sensor, but the first thing that struck us was the unit's 3-inch AMOLED screen. Although resolution is just 640x480, it boasts brilliant brightness and contrast, excellent colour reproduction and 160-degree-plus viewing angles.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Stick it to 'em

We were too busy getting ourselves familiar with the NX10 to catch the name of this insect; could one of

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Stick 'em Rex

By default the NX10 allows you to freely choose a focusing point in about 80 per cent of the shooting space. If that proves to be too slow for you, you can switch to the usual array of pre-defined focus points.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Night safari

After dinner we embarked on Taronga Zoo's night safari. Here, a lion hides out behind a thicket of reeds and, of course, a bank of safety glass.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

The lion sleeps tonight

A full-size crop of the previous image.

Shot details: 4-second exposure; f/5.6; ISO 1600; 70mm on the 50-200mm lens.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Goatee

A mountain goat grazes while trying to ignore the red lights being shone on it.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Stay

We stayed overnight at Taronga Zoo as part of its Roar and Snore programme that allows patrons to stay in permanently erected tents on the zoo's grounds. The tents have a hardwood floor and can sleep up to four people.

This is the Roar and Snore area's central communal tent that's been temporarily transformed into a display and nibblies zone.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

What's that I hear?

Some of the Roar and Snore tents had a brilliant view of the Opera House.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Hot in the city

A 100 per cent crop of the previous Opera House image.

Shot details: 10-second exposure; f/5.6; ISO 100; 200mm on the 70-200mm lens.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

My city of Sydney

What can we say? We love Sydney at night.

Shot details: 20-second exposure; f/5.6; ISO 100; 104mm on the 70-200mm lens.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Focus hard

Move the focus ring and the screen/EVF will automatically zoom into the centre of the image to aid precise focussing. This feature works well during daylight, but at night the screen becomes a haze of noise. Even on brighter scenes, such as this shot of Woolloomooloo, sharpening points of light amongst the noise proves to be difficult.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Morning safari

Waking up with the cockatoos gave us a chance to feed the giraffes carrots. Thanks to the NX10's shutter lag, shooting action shots like this is a matter of putting the camera into continuous shot mode (3fps for up to 10 shots) and hoping for the best.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

That's not a tongue

A 100 per cent crop of the previous shot. According to the zookeepers, one of the zoo's giraffes has a tongue that can stretch up to 40cm.

Shot details: 1/400-second exposure; f/4; ISO 400; 50mm on the 70-200mm lens.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Hey there cutie pie

Aww, it's a cute little quokka. Seriously how could anyone bear to play quokka soccer with one of these little guys?

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Help!

The koala clings on for dear life as it gets stroked and patted by the admiring throng.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Clinging on

Don't pat the koala on its head. That apparently will send it ballistic and it could possibly rip the poor zookeeper's arm off with its razor sharp claws.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Sleepy time

Koalas love munching on eucalyptus leaves, which are unfortunately not a great source of energy. To compensate they sleep for up to 20 hours each day, have a thick coat to keep heat in and have teensy-weensy brains.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

So soft

A full-size crop of the previous image.

Shot details: 1/1250-second exposure; f/2; ISO 400; 30mm on the 30mm lens.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

I don't need no comb

One of the zoo's pelicans grooms itself.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Up close and personal

A full-size crop of the previous image.

Shot details: 1/1500-second exposure; f/4; ISO 400; 50mm on the 50-200mm lens.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

You're on

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Only the best

As a reward for putting up with us, the sea lion gets a fishy treat.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

10/10

The sea lion does a hand stand.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Cool break

After his exertions on land, the sea lion hops into the pool for a quick dip.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

Naming rights

The media and the public gather around to hear the announcement of the baby elephant's name. After its "miracle" birth, the baby elephant has been officially named Pathi Harn — Thai for miracle.

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Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET Australia

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