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HP is concentrating on thin new notebooks at CES, but its Digital Experience desk shows off some smaller goodies, too. Taking a cue from HP's well-received Vivienne Tam-designed Netbook, these mice certainly put plainer-dressed competitors to shame.
Photo by: Lindsey Turrentine/CBS Interactive
Like a tiny recording studio for your Nano, the Xtreme Mac MicroMemo puts your iPod to work recording 16-bit audio via a tiny boom mic or any microphone with a 3.5mm plug. The back of the MicroMemo integrates a small speaker for immediate playback, and the device integrates with iTunes for managing your recordings. Look for the MicroMemo on sale in late spring 2009 for about $80.
Photo by: Lindsey Turrentine/CBS Interactive
iRobot's Looj isn't new, but still cool to see in action. This robotic gutter cleaner promises to keep homeowners everywhere from breaking their backs during the fall downspout-clearing ritual.
Photo by: Lindsey Turrentine/CBS Interactive
Levana's Interference Free Digital Wireless Video Baby Monitor takes a widely popular concept--the video baby monitor--and makes it bearable for parents who struggled with staticy transmissions all night long.
Photo by: Lindsey Turrentine/CBS Interactive
Illuminated by LEDs, 3M's teeny-tiny, MM200 portable digital projector can transmit video from digital cameras, computers, or your phone, as shown. Expect to see the MM200 for sale sometime this year.
Photo by: Lindsey Turrentine/CBS Interactive
Cruzer, perhaps the world's best-known maker or memory sticks, has turned out all variety of high-fashion 2MB sticks.
Photo by: Lindsey Turrentine/CBS Interactive
The eCoupled table demonstrated Fulton Technology's wireless power forays. The company makes a technology that transmits power via magnetic field and charges items from toys to phones simply by placing them above a charging pad. Last year, a similar vendor--Powercast--introduced consumers to wireless power at CES.
Photo by: Lindsey Turrentine/CBS Interactive
This wooden tray is actually an eCoupled charging station. With partners from Bosch Power Tools to Energizer, Fulton Technologies is optimistic that consumers will start seeing mainstream acceptance of eCoupled wireless power technology in the near future.
Photo by: Lindsey Turrentine/CBS Interactive
Energizer's table looks old-fashioned compared with the wireless power demonstration around the corner, but these disposable "Advanced Lithium" batteries are brand-new to the market. According to the company, they last four times longer than "normal" batteries and they cost $7.99. Another, $9.99 battery pack, the "Ultimate Lithium" batteries, should last seven or eight times longer in consumer electronics.
Photo by: Lindsey Turrentine/CBS Interactive

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