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Panasonic's 3D lens

Panasonic's GH2 camera

Panasonic's GH2 camera with 3D lens

Panasonic's 3D lens on a GH2 camera

Showing off 3D still photos

Panasonic's lens, exploded

Panasonic's GH2 camera, exploded

COLOGNE, Germany--Panasonic unveiled a $250 3D camera at Photokina show here. The lens fits onto its Micro Four Thirds-based compact cameras, showing stereo images that with proper equipment can be shown as 3D photos.
Caption by CNET Reviews staff / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET
Panasonic's new GH2 camera, shown from the rear. The compact model is Panasonic's new flagship Micro Four Thirds design, a camera family that, unlike an SLR, uses no flip-up mirror to transmit light to the viewfinder when composing and to the sensor when photographing. Instead, the camera uses live view, including for autofocus chores.
Caption by CNET Reviews staff / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET
Panasonic's new GH2 camera.
Caption by CNET Reviews staff / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET
Panasonic's new GH2 camera sporting a 3D lens at Photokina.
Caption by CNET Reviews staff / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET
How do you look at 3D still photos? With a 3D TV. Panasonic hopes you'll buy one of theirs to go along with your new 3D photos and videos.
Caption by CNET Reviews staff / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET
Mamoru Yoshida, senior vice president of Panasonic's AVC networks group, speaking at Photokina.
Caption by CNET Reviews staff / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET
Ichiro Kitao, director of Panasonic's digital still camera business unit, speaking at Photokina in Cologne, Germany.
Caption by CNET Reviews staff / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET
Lenses are made of several optical elements. Here are the ingredients for Panasonic's new 100-300mm telephoto for its Micro Four Thirds cameras.
Caption by CNET Reviews staff / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET
A lot of ingredients go into a compact camera, in this case the newly announced GH2 from Panasonic. This exploded version starts at the camera's front face, left, and traverses various subsystems through the back.
Caption by CNET Reviews staff / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET
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