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Daddy longlegs eyes

Rat hippocampus

Solitary coral

Licmophora juegensii on red alga

Flower primordium of Tribulus sp

Spirogyra

Eye of a common blue damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum)

Adhesive pad of the first leg of a beetle (Clytus sp.)

Seeds of wild flowers

Weevil (poss. Curculio nucum or Curculio glandium)

Arabidopsis thaliana seedling

Ctenoid scale of a sole

Desmid Micrasterias, starting to divide

Drosophila (fruitfly) larva

Wing scales of Sunset moth (Uranea ripheus)

American Elm seed (Ulmus americana)

Elodea canadensis

Diatom Didymosphenia geminata

Diatom arachnoidiscus

Pleurosigma diatoms

Mouse embryonic spinal cord

Convallaria majalis (lily of the valley) stem

Filamentous cyanobacterium

Mouse retina

At first glance, the winning images from the 2010 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition--put on by the camera company's U.S. arm--look like distant worlds or psychedelic moon landscapes. But take a (much) closer look, and you'll see the images are of life science specimens that surround us every day: seeds, insects, plants, animals, and eyes...

Among the year's winners announced this week, first place went to this colorful specimen of the frontal section of a daddy longlegs' eyes.

First place, Dr. Igor Siwanowicz
Max Planck Institute for Neurobiology
Munich, Germany
Specimen: Frontal section of phalangium opilio (Harvestman/daddy longlegs) eyes
Technique: Confocal
Caption by / Photo by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Entries in the science-as-art competition, now in its eighth year, are judged based on their aesthetics and technical merit, as well as the life science they depict. Winners of this year's competition were announced this week.

"Microscope images forge an extraordinary bond between science and art," said Osamu Joji, Olympus America's vice president and general manager for the Scientific Equipment Group. "We founded this competition to focus on the fascinating stories coming out of today's life science research laboratories. The thousands of images that people have shared with the competition over the years reflect some of the most exciting work going on in research today--work that can help shed light on the living universe and ultimately save lives."

2nd place, Thomas Deerinck
University of California at San Diego
Specimen: Rat hippocampus
Technique: Multiphoton
Caption by / Photo by Thomas Deerinck, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
In addition to advanced research, some of the winning and honorable mention images reflect people's endless fascination with the little things in life such as mushrooms, fish scales, insects, roots, bandages, and red wine.

Third place, James Nicholson
Coral Culture and Collaborative Research Facility, Fort Johnson Marine Lab
Charleston, S.C.
Specimen: Solitary coral, Fungia sp
Technique: Reflected illumination/epifluorescence without barrier filter
Caption by / Photo by James Nicholson, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Fourth place, Wolfgang Bettighofer
Kiel, Germany
Specimen: Licmophora juegensii on red alga
Technique: Differential interference contrast
Caption by / Photo by Wolfgang Bettighofer, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Fifth place, Dr. M.R. Dadpour
Department of Horticultural Sciences, University of Tabriz
Tabriz, Iran
Specimen: Flower primordium of Tribulus sp
Technique: Epi-illumination, 100 z-stacked images
Caption by / Photo by Dr. M.R. Dadpour, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Sixth place, Dr. Jerzy Gubernator
Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw Wroclaw, Poland
Specimen: Spirogyra
Technique: Brightfield
Caption by / Photo by Dr. Jerzy Gubernator, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Seventh place, Dr. Igor Siwanowicz
Max Planck Institute for Neurobiology
Munich, Germany
Specimen: Eye of a common blue damselfly (enallagma cyathigerum)
Technique: Confocal, series projection
Caption by / Photo by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Eighth place, Dr. Jan Michels
Christian Albrecht University of Kiel, Institute of Zoology
Kiel, Germany
Specimen: Adhesive pad of the first leg of a beetle (Clytus sp.)
Technique: Autofluorescence
Caption by / Photo by Dr. Jan Michels, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Ninth place, Yanping Wang
Beijing Planetarium
Beijing, China
Specimen: Seeds of wild flowers
Technique: Brightfield reflected light
Caption by / Photo by Ms. Yanping Wang, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Tenth place, Laurie Knight
Tonbridge, Kent, U.K.
Specimen: Weevil (poss. Curculio nucum or Curculio glandium)
Technique: Episcopic illumination
Caption by / Photo by Laurie Knight, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Fernán Federici
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge
Cambridge, U.K.
Specimen: Arabidopsis thaliana seedling
Technique: Confocal
Caption by / Photo by Fernan Federici, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Ralph Grimm
Jimboomba, Queensland, Australia
Specimen: Ctenoid scale of a sole
Technique: Differential interference contrast
Caption by / Photo by Ralph Grimm, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Dr. Antonio Guillén
Logroño, La Rioja, Spain
Specimen: Desmid Micrasterias, starting to divide
Technique: Darkfield and polarized light
Caption by / Photo by Dr. Antonio Guillen, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Dr. Chun Han
University of California
San Francisco
Specimen: Drosophila (fruitfly) larva
Technique: Confocal with image stacks
Caption by / Photo by Dr. Chun Han, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Laurie Knight
Tonbridge, Kent, U.K.
Specimen: Wing scales of Sunset moth (Uranea ripheus)
Technique: Episcopic illumination
Caption by / Photo by Laurie Knight, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Edwin Lee
Carrollton, Texas
Specimen: American Elm seed (Ulmus americana)
Technique: Stereo microscopy and polarized light
Caption by / Photo by Edwin Lee, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Marek Mis
Suwalki, Poland
Specimen: Elodea canadensis
Technique: Polarized light
Caption by / Photo by Marek Mis, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Dr. Stephen S. Nagy
Helena, Mont.
Specimen: Diatom Didymosphenia geminata
Technique: Interference microscopy
Caption by / Photo by Dr. Stephen S. Nagy, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Dr. Michael Shribak
Marine Biological Laboratory
Woods Hole, Mass.
Specimen: Diatom arachnoidiscus
Technique: Polarized light
Caption by / Photo by Dr. Michael Shribak, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Dr. Michael Shribak
Marine Biological Laboratory
Woods Hole, Mass.
Specimen: Pleurosigma diatoms
Technique: Polarized light
Caption by / Photo by Dr. Michael Shribak, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Juyong Yoon
Yonsei University
Seoul
Specimen: Mouse embryonic spinal cord
Technique: Confocal
Caption by / Photo by Honorable mention, Juyong Yoon, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Tong Zhang
McGill University
Montreal
Specimen: Convallaria majalis (lily of the valley) stem
Technique: Confocal
Caption by / Photo by Tong Zhang, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Dr. Petr Znachor
Institute of Hydrobiology
Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic
Specimen: Potentially toxic filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaenopsis
Technique: Differential interference contrast
Caption by / Photo by Dr. Petr Znachor, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Honorable mention, Thomas Deerinck
University of California, San Diego
Specimen: Mouse retina
Technique: Confocal
Caption by / Photo by Thomas Deerinck, Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition
Updated:
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