CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Christmas Gift Guide

This is the Oakley Radar Pace. It's available now for $450, £400 or AU$640.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

While it may look like a normal pair of athletic sunglasses, it's much smarter than that.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The thick frame houses a variety of sensors that can measure movement and elevation. This includes an accelerometer, gyroscope, barometer, and humidity and proximity sensors. There's also Bluetooth and ANT+ for pairing a heart rate strap, footpod, cycling power meter and speed or cadence sensors.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

But these sunglasses don't have a digital display like some other smart glasses I've seen.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

Instead, there are Micro-USB ports on each side of the frame for attaching earphones.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

Not only does this allow you listen to music streamed from your phone during workouts, but it's also how you can receive coaching.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The Radar Pace can offer real-time coaching and feedback on your runs and bike rides.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The app will also create a training program that is tailored to you and your athletic ability.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The glasses use Intel's Real Speech technology, which allows you to ask and respond to questions in a natural way. You can ask a question, such as, "How's my pace?" and then follow it up with, "Is that good?" Think of it as Amazon's Alexa, but on steroids.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

A touch pad on the left temple lets you change songs, adjust the volume, accept calls and activate Google Now or Siri.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The Radar Pace comes with a sturdy carrying case, detachable earphones and cleaning rag.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

It also comes with clear lenses that can be used at night or on cloudy days.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

The app provides ample post-run data, including a map of your route, elapsed time, distance, pace, calories burned, elevation and stride rate.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

Here's a map of a recent run I did in New York.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

You can even see all of the commentary from your workout. The Radar Pace was letting me know that my stride rate was too low and that I should be taking smaller, quicker steps to improve it.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

Here's some more pictures of the Radar Pace.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET

Read the full review of the Oakley Radar Pace to find out more.

Caption by / Photo by Sarah Tew/CNET
Published:
Up Next
The 35 best VR games
38