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Christmas Gift Guide

Mira Prism costs $99, and it's a bit like Microsoft HoloLens on an extreme budget.

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Prism floats 3D augmented reality in front of your face.

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The headset works with iPhones and uses the iPhone screen to project images.

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Pop in an iPhone and slip the headset on.

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Stereoscopic images are projected onto the curved, mirrored visor.

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It looks like images float in 3D, and the effect's not bad.

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Prism uses the iPhone motion sensors and cameras to keep projected images lined up with the real world.

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You can peek at AR worlds using another iPhone running Mira's app, or wear another headset at the same time.

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The visor's removable.

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The strap attaches easily, too.

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An included remote interacts with the holographic effects.

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Mira Prism will support Unity for app development, and an SDK aims to make it easier to create games and software.

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The effects, however, weren't as impressive as Apple's upcoming ARKit.

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The entire kit.

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The remote doesn't have six degrees of freedom tracking, so it can't reach out and literally touch things, but it has motion controls and buttons.

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A look at the side of the headset.

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The remote has a trackpad, a rear trigger and buttons.

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Side view.

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The iPhone juts out a bit from the flexible-fabric top of the headset.

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Look closely, and you can see AR reflected on the lenses.

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The velcro straps for attaching it on-head.

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The headset's lightweight.

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Its lens-visor is large, though.

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At least there's comfy padding.

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The visor folds down or can be detached.

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The Prism's future app library remains unclear.

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It could be a challenge to convince app developers to choose this over on-iPhone AR with ARKit.

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One of the included markers that's needed to keep 3D images pinned to a location: Prism doesn't map surfaces as well as Apple's ARKit yet.

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Removing the plastic visor (you'll need to do this for travel).

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How many more AR headsets will emerge?

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We'll know more in the fall.

Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
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