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Anonymous in DC

Hundreds of protesters around the world donned masks on Tuesday in what the hacking collective Anonymous called the "Million Mask March." The protests, scheduled for 450 cities and towns worldwide, were meant to bring attention to corporate and government corruption.

Protesters in Washington D.C. marched past the Capitol Building and gathered in front of the White House.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
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NSA under fire

A masked protester in Washington D.C. takes aim at the US National Security Agency. The demonstrations were held on Guy Fawkes Day, November 5. Fawkes masks are commonly seen at protests against the NSA surveillance program and in Occupy actions.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
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Streets of Sao Paulo

People link arms during protests on Tuesday in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Miguel Schincariol/AFP/Getty Images
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Arrest in Brazil

Policemen arrest a protester during a demonstration in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Though there were some arrests, the protest appeared to have stayed relatively peaceful.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Miguel Schincariol/AFP/Getty Images
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Clean up in Japan

Demonstrations in Japan took on an environmental twist as people wearing masks picked up litter in Tokyo.

Updated:Caption:Photo:TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images
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Rally in the Philippines

Riot police block protesters wearing Guy Fawkes masks during a rally in the Philippines.

Updated:Caption:Photo:JAY DIRECTO/AFP/Getty Images
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Waiting on the White House

Protesters participating in Anonymous' "Million Mask March" stand in front of the White House. Revelations about NSA surveillance programs, sparked by documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, have pushed President Barack Obama to authorize both internal and external reviews of the NSA's activities.

Updated:Caption:Photo:SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
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