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OAKLAND, Calif.--At Kaiser Permanente's Garfield Center for Innovation, the health care giant is testing not just robotics, but new, more efficient hospital room designs.

Kaiser held a demonstration day at the center Thursday for physicians and health care professionals to check out, and give feedback on, future technologies being evaluated for rollout.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
The future hospital room is being used to test new medical monitoring devices, like this respiration sensor, which uses Doppler radar instead of wired sensors to read a patient's breathing rate.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
In a mock-up home of a Kaiser patient, this prototype medical terminal can collect data from home devices like blood pressure cuffs, and also allow doctor-patient video communication.
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A new Roomba with a camera mounted on it can be used to help families check up on their home-bound relatives. The floor-level camera might give a somewhat unflattering view, though.
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Here, Berkeley Bionics' eLegs system helps paraplegic Ted Kilroy walk. The crutches contain pressure sensors and help signal the rig to move Kilroy's legs.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
The eLegs system uses a battery pack and electric motors, unlike Berkeley Bionics' other exoskeleton, the military HULC system, which uses hydraulics.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
Kinova's Jaco arm is designed to help people with limited upper-body mobility perform daily tasks like feeding themselves. It can be controlled by a joystick or other interface.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
The Jaco's end effectors are flexible fingers. They're strong enough to lift a few pounds but they can't do any real damage to people if wrongly directed.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
SRI International is still working on its telemedicine system, which lets a surgeon control a pair of manipulators from around the globe. This system is being tested by the military.
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The control station for the remote surgery lets the physician see in 3D and feel what the manipulators are doing.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
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