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The inspiration

Pinterest's design, a grid of items with varying heights, is showing up everywhere. Here's the real McCoy.

Read Pinterest design spreading like a virus, because it works to learn more.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshot by Rafe Needleman/CNET
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Trippy

This travel site, Trippy, unapologetically uses Pinterest's design concept.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshot by Rafe Needleman/CNET
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Hunuku

Hunuku is a limited social site, for families only. It's calls on the "family quilt" for design inspiration. Coincidence?

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshot by Rafe Needleman/CNET
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Hipswap

The consumer commerce site Hipswap also uses a grid, but it's not staggered.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshot by Rafe Needleman/CNET
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Pixable

While Pixable is primarily a mobile product, the Web version of the service looks awfully familiar.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshot by Rafe Needleman/CNET
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Friendsheet

You can view your Facebook photos in a staggered grid, with Friendsheet. (See How to view Facebook photos, Pinterest-style.

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Wookmark

Build your own Pinterest-alike with a jQuery plug-in like this one.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshot by Rafe Needleman/CNET
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Masonry

David Desandro's Masonry is another option for site builders.

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Swell for Tumblr

You can even bend Tumblr into a mimic of Pinterest.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Screenshot by Rafe Needleman/CNET
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