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In a hot, dry field on the outskirts of Huambo, Angola, a group of women are learning to become deminers. A job that can mean life or death.

This training facility is part of the Halo Trust's school for deminers. The new class of trainees is all women, who are learning the skills to safely remove landmines. 

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

In the training fields, Ralph Legg of The Halo Trust talks proper demining technique and calibrates a trainee's handheld metal detector.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Although this is a mock minefield meant for training purposes, everything here is treated as if it were real. 

All rules and standards of operations are followed by the book. Safety gear is worn at all times. 

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Demining is slow and tedious, often in thick brush under the hot sun.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Demining takes patience and attention to detail.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Following meter-wide lanes, deminers move forward just a few inches at a time, scanning the ground with metal detectors as they go.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Calibrating a metal detector. 

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Once something is detected in the ground, the site is excavated from the side to expose what's beneath.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Workers get a 10 minute break from every 30 minutes.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Demining is a slow and potentially dangerous process, but The Halo Trust teaches trainees that proper protocols will keep them safe.  

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

During Angola's civil war, an estimated 1 million landmines were buried.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

A trainee calibrates her metal detector.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Marking out a new line to follow.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

A trainee works under the hot sun in Huambo, Angola.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

The training camp's facilities include canvas tents for sleeping, a common area, a kitchen and storage units made from shipping containers.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

A Halo Trust trainee measures a lane to be cleared.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

All brush must be cleared before deminers can use metal detectors.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

At the end of training, these women must pass a written exam and a field test before they officially become deminers.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Demining work is slow and methodical, any mistake can be deadly.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
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