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First, there was a truck

Let the dismantling begin

It was unsafe to drive

All of the useable parts were salvaged

The car was a shell of its former self

Here's what happened to the rest of the shell

There was no way to repair the car

Preparing for mounting

A tinted windshield is legal if it's hanging from your wall

Then the bottom was touched up

It's the slowest car on two wheels

Just a quick shine

Strapping it to the forklift

Lifting the truck into place

Bolting it into the studs

A different view of the mounting process

Unhooked from the forklift

The finished product

The finished product

The finished product

The finished product

USB LED lights were added to the front and rear housings

They're powered by cell phone chargers

The rear window is made of plexiglass

No actual rabbits were harmed in the creation of this masterpiece

Blake Hendrickson is the owner of CarParts4Sale.com in Iowa City, Iowa. During the summer of 2017, he recycled this old Volkswagen Rabbit pickup into an impressive art project. We spotted this amazing DIY and asked him how he pulled it off. Here's how he did it, in his own words:

"I own a VW dismantling business, and it is business as usual to dismantle MK1 Rabbits," he told Roadshow. "All the good parts were salvaged. A side art project was done at the same time as the dismantling."

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

"Started off with a 1983 VW Rabbit Caddy pickup MK1... diesel."

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

"This truck was done for. It looks nice in the pictures, but it had severe rust."

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

"A reciprocating saw was used for most of the cutting."

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

"An engine lift, dolly cart and forklift were mostly what moved this partial car around."

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

"The leftover shell was recycled at a local metal recycling facility."

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

"Here is an example of the deep-buried rust. Those are massive holes, and this is just a picture that I happened to take, not even trying to identify rust." 

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

"The board is a two-by-ten. We used bolts through several parts of the truck's body."

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

"The windshield was cut and painted from the backside to look tinted, because it cracked when cutting."

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

"The underside was fiberglassed in some areas where it was rusted through, and 3M-brand undercoat was used for the black look."

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

"The wheels were mounted with trailer spare-tire mounts from Harbor Freight."

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

"No paintwork was done, but we did polish."

Keep going to see more pictures from this amazingly cool project, including the final touch: USB LED taillights.

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson

Caption by / Photo by Blake Hendrickson
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