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DreamColor

The x2 is the first laptop to offer a 30-bit 4K stylus-supporting display.

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Optimized for Adobe apps

HP says it worked closely with Adobe when developing the ZBook x2 (seen here running Photoshop), which isn't surprising given the laptop's feature set.

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Keyboard

You can see how it tilts up when attached, though you can also make it lie flat.

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A lot of vents

Because it's running a quad-core CPU and midrange Nvidia Quadro GPU, it can generate a lot of heat. HP incorporated two fans and venting everywhere to compensate.

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Detach me

When detached, the keyboard connects to the tablet via Bluetooth so you can still use it.

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Left side

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Side view

Here, you can see the keyboard lying flat and the kickstand hinge, which draws its design from HP's Spectre and Envy lines.

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The view from above

The speakers fire up, which is suboptimal, but a small trade-off.

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Connections

It has a pretty nice set of connections given its size; smart card and SD card slots, a USB Type-A, full-size HDMI and two USB-C Thunderbolt ports.

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Keyboard

HP does a pretty good job with its keyboards, and the touchpad is relatively large.

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Kickstand

It feels rigid enough to stand up to inking.

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Top

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Stylus

HP uses Wacom's EMR technology for its stylus, and the weight and balance feel pretty similar to Wacom's versions. Here it sits in my pudgy hand. 

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Quick Keys

Along the sides of the display are two sets of buttons that can be programmed with up to 18 shortcuts, very much like a Wacom Intuos or MobileStudio.

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Side view

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Vents

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Moar vents

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Stylus

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Stylus

It has a similar weighted feel to Wacom's latest versions. (On a side note, I have no idea what those brown spots are on my wrist. They are not there in real life.)

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Quick Keys redux

Wow. This shot is full of optical illusions. It makes the x2 look like it was designed by Escher.

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Cameras

It's got HP's standard webcam and an IR camera for Windows Hello. The cameras are the one disappointment on the x2.

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Back camera

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