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Viacom: Alleged early copyright infringements

Viacom: More alleged infringement

Viacom: Short video clips

Google: Secretly uploading videos

Google: Permission given

Viacom: Google e-mails on YouTube

Brin questions what's Googley

Google brief

Another Google exerpt

Aware of infringement

YouTube purchase

Google: YouTube used to promote content

Viacom and Google on Thursday made hundreds of pages of court documents public in their copyright dispute over YouTube. We've excerpted some of the most interesting tidbits.

This is a snippet from an 86-page document made public Thursday that Viacom claims represents facts that Google does not dispute. A federal judge eventually will decide which are true and relevant to the copyright lawsuit.

On this page, Viacom is hoping to demonstrate that in the early days of YouTube--before it was bought by Google--the company's founders allowed copyright infringements. These e-mail excerpts come from the first half of 2005, a few months after YouTube was founded.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET

These excerpts are from what Viacom claims are undisputed facts, representing the company's effort to show that YouTube's founders allowed users to infringe others' copyrights.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET

Here's another excerpt showing what Viacom claims are undisputed facts.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET

Google also filed a series of briefs on Thursday, which say that Viacom complained about copyright infringements while secretly uploading videos, using fake e-mail addresses, and sending employees to Kinko's to upload clips from computers that couldn't be traced to Viacom.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET

Google says that Viacom included a list of allegedly infringing video clips in the current lawsuit for which -- whoops! -- Viacom actually had given permission to be uploaded.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET

Excerpts from Google e-mail messages in early 2006 appear in a Viacom brief made public on Thursday. Google bought YouTube for $1.7 billion in stock in October 2006.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET

In a conversation recounted in an excerpted e-mail message, Google co-founder Sergey Brin wondered whether allowing copyright infringements was "Googley?"

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET

An excerpt from Google's brief filed Thursday. The lawsuit began in March 2007 and seeks over $1 billion in damages

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET

Another excerpt from a document that Google filed Thursday.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET

E-mail messages and instant messaging logs--did neither Google nor YouTube have a routine document destruction policy?--show that YouTube managers knew that copyright infringement was happening, Viacom claims.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET

CNET reported in November 2006 that in the YouTube purchase, "12.5 percent of the equity issued and issuable in the transaction will be subject to escrow for one year to secure certain indemnification obligations." The Viacom lawsuit was filed five months later.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET

"Plaintiffs' widespread use of YouTube to market and promote their content--uses that continued even in the midst of this litigation--defeats any notion that the presence of their material on YouTube creates a fact or circumstance from which infringing activity is apparent," a Google brief made public Thursday says.

Disclosure: The author of the captions is married to a Google employee who is not involved with YouTube.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Declan McCullagh/CNET
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