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Touchdown

On approach

Nearly there

All wheels down

Slowing down

Rolling by

Turning off runway

Moving forward

Stopping

Close-up of front

Ground crew

Towed bag in

Stairs roll up

Pilot waving

Brass greeting pilots

Putting in blocks.

Tail with trailing cone

Tails crossed

Joe Sutter

JFS

Ground crew working

Airline customers

SEATTLE--Sunday was a big day for Boeing. This morning, its all-new 747-8 Intercontinental took off on its first-ever test flight. The plane, which is said to be the fastest and most fuel- and cost-efficient passenger aircraft in Boeing's history, has a planned late 2011 first customer delivery.

Four-and-a-half hours after taking off from Paine Field in Everett, Wash., the plane touched down--seen here--at Boeing Field. During the flight, the pilots took the plane as high as 20,000 feet, and up to 250 knots, and put it through a series of tests.

Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
After nearly four and a half hours in flight, the 747-8 Intercontinental is finally seen on approach for its first-ever landing, at Boeing Field.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
Just seconds before landing, the plane's wheels are almost on the ground.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
At 2:25 p.m. PT, the plane landed, and here, we see it just as its nose wheels hit the ground.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The 747-8 Intercontinental rolls by the risers on which dozens of members of the press corps set up to watch the landing.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The 747-8 Intercontinental's first flight lasted just under four and a half hours. Here, we see the plane rolling by just seconds after touching down.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The plane turns slowly off the runway at Boeing Field.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The 747-8 Intercontinental rolls forward slowly on its way back toward the hangar inside which Boeing thew a party to celebrate the plane's first landing Sunday.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
With a member of the ground crew directing, the plane comes to a complete rest.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
A close-up of the front of the all-new 747.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The Boeing Field ground crew rushes into to tend to the plane after its first-ever landing.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The 747-8 Intercontinental is towed back in after its landing.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
A set of rolling aviation stairs is hustled into place, moments after the plane came to rest in front of a large crowd of press, Boeing employees, and others.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
Chief 747 pilot Mark Feuerstein waves to the crowd moments after emerging from the all-new 747-8 Intercontinental.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
A group of senior Boeing executives, including Elizabeth Lund, vice president and general manager of the 747 program.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
A Boeing employee works to put in blocks in front of the plane's wheels.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The 747-8's tail, seen here with its trailing cone waving behind it in the wind.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
Here we see the tails of the 747-8 Intercontinental crossed with that of an Air Maroque 737.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
Joe Sutter, the "father of the 747," on hand at the landing of the first 747-8 Intercontinental on Sunday at Boeing Field in Seattle.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
In honor of Sutter, Boeing painted his initials, "JFS," on the nose gear cover.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The ground crew works on the landing gear, moments after landing on Sunday.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The 747-8 Intercontinental that completed its first flight was emblazoned with the logos of the first four commercial customers of the plane: Lufthansa, Korean Air, Boeing Business Jets, and Air China.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
Updated:
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