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Canadian manufacturer Bombardier is big in transportation. It makes trains, subway cars. monorails, light rail vehicles and airplanes. If you're not lucky enough to have flown in one of its posh business jets, there's a good chance you've flown in one of the company's regional jets that are popular with airlines on shuttle routes.

But the company is stretching its commercial airline business with the medium-range CSeries aircraft. Bombardier showed the latest version in the family, the CS300, at the Paris Air Show. Click on for a peek inside.

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A blunter nose is a characteristic of newer aircraft and the CS300 is no exception. With the engines turned off, generators provided power to the cabin and much-needed air conditioning on a blazingly hot summer day.

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The CS300 is manufactured at Bombardier's factory in Montreal. The aircraft made its first flight in February, 2015.

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Latvian airline AirBaltic is the airline launch customer. Its first aircraft was delivered in December, 2016.

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On the right side of the photo is another Bombardier commuter aircraft, the turboprop Dash 8 Q400.

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Inside the cabin, economy class seating is a 3-2 configuration. Business class would have just two seats on either side of the aisle. 

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The CS300 can seat a maximum of 160 passengers. A more typical passenger configuration would be 130 seats.

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A movable divider can cut the cabin into sections.

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Bombardier says that the overhead bins can fit a rolling suitcase for every passenger.

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Pilots fly the CS300 with a control stick instead of a control column. It's a bit like flying a fighter jet or playing video games in a very expensive joystick.

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Maybe this is an airline exec making a deal for new aircraft? We're not really sure.

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LCD monitors show flight data, altitude and position. The map on the second screen from the right is of Le Bourget Airport where the Paris Air Show takes place.

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The throttles between the seats control power to the engines.

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Though the cockpit isn't overwhelmed with controls, there's still a lot to keep track of.

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A joyride flight would have been fun, but this is as far as we went.

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The CS300 flies on two Pratt & Whitney PW1500G engines.

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The CS300 has a maximum range of 3,300 nautical miles (3,798 miles or 6,112 km) and can reach a maximum speed of 541 miles per hour or 871 km per hour. 

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Parked next door is the Russian-made Sukhoi Superjet SSJ100 in the gorgeous colors of Mexican airline Interjet. 

Caption by / Photo by Kent German/CNET
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