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Welcome to the Art of Brick, a new exhibition in London featuring the Mona Lisa, a life-size dinosaur and One Direction -- in Lego! It took artist Nathan Sawaya 4,188 hours -- and millions of Lego bricks -- to build the 75 pieces in the show, which will be on display until January 2015.

Related article: Art of the Brick rebuilds the Mona Lisa, Jimi Hendrix and a dinosaur in Lego

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Our tour will begin imminently.

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This is what it's all about: the humble Lego brick, so small yet so mighty.

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Seeing as we're in London, there's a few local touches like this full-size red phone box -- yes, made entirely out of Lego.

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Artist Nathan Sawaya is the man behind the show.

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Sawaya swapped the law for Lego to become a sculptor.

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Here's a sculpture you might recognise: Rodin's The Thinker.

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On each creation, getting up close reveals the detail of studs and bricks.

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Each creation is explained by a handy tablet.

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It's the Mona Lego-sa.

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That famous enigmatic smile gets even more enigmatic in brick form.

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Michaelangelo's David, and the Venus De Milo cast in Lego.

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The original stands in the Galleria dell'Accademia in Florence. More like Michaelang-Lego, amirite?

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The original Aphrodite of Milos was created by Alexandros of Antioch between 130 and 100 BC. Don't worry, she's armless!

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Edvard Munch painted The Scream in 1893.

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The Lego version adds an extra dimension.

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Tell me about it, stud.

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The exhibitions involves a number of portraits too.

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The portraits look like photos as you approach them...

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...but remember this is what they are made of.

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Excuse me while I kiss this guy.

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Original sketches...

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...and the results.

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Wait...what's that noise over there...?

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Aaaaaarrrrrgghhh!

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This is the biggest sculpture in the exhibit: a man-size dinosaur skeleton.

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Clever girl...

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Speaking of clever girls.

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The next section of the exhibition is dedicated to existential statues like this one.

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Anyone got any Aspirin? I've got a splitting headache.

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Band of skulls.

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Is this what's under a Lego minifig's yellow bonce?

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Bit "Alien," this one.

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We've all had those days.

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Happens to the best of us.

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He's bricking it.

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That's no way to get ahead.

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Nnnnnnoooooo!

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These faces stand several feet tall, dominating the wall.

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What does it all mean?

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At least these faces are cheerful.

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Here you can see the scale of each piece and the number of bricks that go into them.

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All mouth, this one.

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Don't you just hate it when that happens.

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Cut me, do I not bleed bricks?

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Bricks in spaaaaace!

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He's got the whole world in his hands.

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I wish my monitor would stop doing that. It's very distracting.

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Someone's an Apple fanboy.

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You can almost taste the salt in the air.

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Where else can you have all the world's greatest works of art in one room?

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You've got to admire the brushwork. So... blocky.

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Here we see the Lego version of Vermeer's Girl with a Pearl Earring.

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Well, we are in Britain -- so say hello to life-size versions of One Direction.

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That's actually a remarkably accurate depiction of Harry's face when you get up close.

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The Art of the Brick also includes a Lego play area so after you've enjoyed the show you can get stuck into the bricks yourself.

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Well, quite.

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