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Christmas Gift Guide

The evolution of Daredevil

Daredevil #1 (1964)

Daredevil #7 (1965)

The Trial of the Incredible Hulk (1989)

Daredevil #319 (1993)

The Man Without Fear (1993)

Flying Blind (1998)

Daredevil (2003)

Shadowland (2010)

Marvel's Daredevil (2015)

For a blind man, Daredevil sure does look sharp. Variations of his signature horned costume have kept the Hell's Kitchen vigilante looking good as he takes on supervillains using only his fists and his heightened senses.

Comic industry legends including Jack Kirby, Bill Everett, Wally Wood and Frank Miller have had a hand in shaping Daredevil's look over the years. He's leapt from Hell's Kitchen rooftops on the pages of Marvel comics to the big screen and now to his own brooding, brutal series on Netflix, so with the help of Shirts.com, let's take a look at some of those devilishly cool costumes.

Caption by / Photo by Shirts.com

The blind crimefighter was created by Jack Kirby and Bill Everett and made his debut in 1964, decked out in yellow, black and red -- and a pair of horns. In issue #5, new artist Wally Wood replaced the single D with the iconic overlapping Ds.

Caption by / Photo by Shirts.com

Wood then introduced a whole new costume in issue #7, and the classic look was born. The timeless red costume has remained the template ever since, with tweaks to the double-D emblem including a change by Frank Miller that harked back to the original D design.

Caption by / Photo by Shirts.com

In the 1989 TV movie "The Trial of the Incredible Hulk," lawyer Matt Murdock (Rex Smith) agrees to defend David Banner (Bill Bixby) in court. But both men have secrets: Banner is big green trouser-ripping machine the Hulk, and Murdock is vigilante Daredevil, fighting bad guys in black spandex. It was hoped the movie would act as a pilot for a Daredevil series, but it never happened.

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Our hero donned an armoured black costume to take on superpowered villains -- Matt Murdock is, after all, highly skilled but only human. Scott McDaniel had his work cut out coming up with a look that would please everybody.

Caption by / Photo by Shirts.com

Frank Miller and John Romita Jr. returned to Daredevil's roots in this miniseries exploring his origin, kitting out the young hero in street-tough comfy black hoodie and sweatpants, a black mask and stylin' white retro kicks. He only adopted the red costume on the final page.

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Waking in a French hospital, artist Laurent Levasseur is puzzled to discover he can see. Only later does he realise he is actually Matt Murdock, his brain rewired for a secret mission for intelligence agency SHIELD. Hence this costume echoes the classic Daredevil colours, combined with a SHIELD uniform in this story by Scott Lobdell, Cully Hamner and Jason Martin told in Daredevil #376-379.

Caption by / Photo by Shirts.com

Ben Affleck donned a red leather suit for the disappointing 2003 movie. The creative process was not without headaches: designer James Acheson recalls a conference call with executives involving "a 40-minute conversation about the colour red".

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In this story written by Andy Diggle and others, Matt Murdock assumes leadership of mystical ninja cult The Hand, and attempts to steer them towards being a bit nicer. However, he's possessed by the demon The Beast of the Hand, leading to a showdown with other New York-based heroes including Spider-Man, the Punisher, Luke Cage and Iron Fist.

Caption by / Photo by Shirts.com

Charlie Cox dons a black outfit and mask to fight crime in the "Daredevil" TV series now on Netflix. According to costume designer Stephanie Maslansky, the outfit will evolve over time -- leading to a big final reveal...

Caption by / Photo by Shirts.com
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