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Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

SAN FRANCISCO -- Could 3D-printed models of cities be the next great tool in urban planning? The folks at Autodesk and design agency Steelblue think so.

On Wednesday, the two companies showed off what they said is the largest-ever 3D-printed model of San Francisco, and possibly the largest 3D-printed model of any city ever.

Designed and built to help real-estate developer Tishman Speyer visualize the work it's doing in downtown San Francisco, the model showcases 115 blocks of the city at a scale of 1:1,250.

That would make the Godzilla toy placed on the model as a joke very, very large.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

During the demonstration of the 3D-printed model of San Francisco, a group of visual cues were projected onto it, showing how the model could be used to signify demographic or political differentiations, as represented by colors.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

A look at the 3D-printed model of San Francisco, which took about two months to make (including prototypes) and cost less than $20,000 -- not counting labor.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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of 14

Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

One of the key value propositions of the model is that it can be lit up to highlight many different projects, neighborhoods, or even individual buildings. Here we see the Transbay Transit Center development project, a major infrastructure upgrade, that is currently under way and expected to be finished by 2017.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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of 14

Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

The model doesn't cover the entire city, but it does encompass one tower of the famous Bay Bridge.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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of 14

Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

One of the first things most people who look at the model do is find their own buildings. This photo includes CNET headquarters, just to the left of the word "2nd."

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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of 14

Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

Steelblue president O'Brien Chalmers carries a smaller prototype of the model across the room.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

Another use for the model is to test out shadow patterns throughout the day. By shining light that mimics the transit of the sun, planners can determine where shadows will fall.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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of 14

Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

The big colored circles were used to demonstrate how different zones of the city could be highlighted differently.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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of 14

Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

On the right is an unfinished prototype, while on the left is a finished prototype. The difference is that the before piece has not yet been brushed clean to remove the outer layer of resin left by the 3D printer.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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of 14

Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

Another use for the model is to visualize traffic patterns on the streets of downtown San Francisco.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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of 14

Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

Longtime San Francisco residents remember the Embarcadero freeway, which came off the Bay Bridge and ran along the city's eastern waterfront. After 1989's devastating Loma Prieta earthquake, the freeway, and others in the city, were demolished. The red pathways on the model show where those roadways used to be.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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of 14

Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

Autodesk's Justin Lokitz and Steelblue's O'Brien Chalmers discuss the 3D-printed San Francisco project.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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of 14

Godzilla and the 3D-printed San Francisco

Multicolored city

3D-printed San Francisco

Transbay development

Bay Bridge

CNET HQ

O'Brien with prototype

Shadow patterns

Highlighting zones

Before and after models

Traffic patterns

Old freeway routes

Justin and O'Brien

3D-printed city

Another look at the 3D-printed model of San Francisco.

See related article: 3D-printed San Francisco -- the next great tool in city planning


Updated: / Caption: / Photo: Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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