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​Zuckerberg close to updating Facebook's mission

The CEO posts the founder's letter he wrote five years ago and says he's almost done writing a new one. The social network's Sheryl Sandberg is reflecting, too.

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, speaking here via satellite at a November company forum on social good, says he's almost done writing a updated mission statement.

Kevin Mazur, Getty Images for Facebook

Facebook and its executives are in a contemplative mood.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday reposted to his Facebook page the founder's letter he wrote five years ago about how he saw the social network's community and role in the world, just as it was filing its IPO.

Perhaps more interesting, he also noted that he's close to issuing a founder's letter 2.0. "I'm almost done writing a new letter about how I see our community and our role evolving, and I'll share it soon," he wrote.

And the time seems ripe, as Facebook is much more than the social network it was five years ago. Case in point is news Monday that it appears to be building an app that would put Facebook video on television set-top boxes. In addition to working on video, virtual reality and other efforts, Facebook, with its 1.79 billion users, has also become an influential news source.

Meanwhile, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg is doing her fair share of rumination. After adding her voice to the chorus of tech leaders speaking out against President Donald Trump's immigration ban, on Wednesday she reportedly expressed regret about not speaking up earlier about the Women's March last month.

"I had a personal obligation which meant I couldn't go," Sandberg said in an interview with Recode's Kara Swisher. "I just felt bad about not being there. So I think once I felt bad I just didn't feel comfortable posting, and I think that was a mistake. And if I had to do it again I certainly would've posted."

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