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Tech Industry

Week in review: Jan. 20-24

For those who were unable to keep up with technology news during the week and would like to get caught up, we offer a roundup of the week's highlights.

For those who were unable to keep up with technology news during the week and would like to get caught up, we offer a roundup of the week's highlights:

 In The Net 

AOL must be praying that there isn't a repeat of this past week anytime soon. For the beleaguered online service provider, if it wasn't one thing, it was another. Already reeling from user fury over service problems (see our Poll results), AOL also came under the scrutiny from Attorneys General from several states concerned with the state of affairs. Making matters worse, AOL was named in a kiddie porn suit and rivals are trying to steal subscribers away. Competitors, however, seem to face the same kind of service problems as AOL.
AOL faces kiddie porn suit
States may sue AOL
Law checks on AOL
AOL rivals face same problem
AOL users won't take it anymore

 In The Net 

In other Net news, PointCast, having garnered a user base of 1.5 million users, is mulling a subscription fee for a portion of the service. Meanwhile, Internet service providers are trying to overcome headaches that success sometimes brings. And for some people in the East, a new service called ADSL promises to makes the World Wide Wait a thing of the past.
Pointcast may start charging for service
ISPs suffer from success
ADSL gets east coast trial

 In Computing 

In the world of computing it was a week of people trying to overturn the apple cart. Apple CTO Ellen Hancock said she wants to turn the company into a software and service provider; a group of Asian chip makers wants to provide a faster, better alternative to Intel's chips; and Sony unveiled a technology that makes it easy to link your PC to your VCR.
Apple sees future in software
Asian chip vendors go after Intel
Sony connects PC to VCR
Word 97 antivirus needs booster
Compaq serves up low prices

 In Business 

IBM?s fourth-quarter results exceeded estimates, but investors still drove the stock down $10 per share. A decline in shipments and additional costs from the acquisition of Cray Research caused Silicon Graphics to report a second-quarter net loss of $13 million. Sybase, meanwhile, rebounded from a rough year by reporting that it was back in the black in the fourth quarter.
IBM stock plummets
SGI financials disappoint
Wall Street snubs Sybase