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Vendors get moving on Moving Worlds

Interactive 3D interfaces may soon be seen all over the Net if the companies jumping on the Moving Worlds standard have their say.

Interactive 3D interfaces may soon be seen all over the Net if the companies jumping on the Moving Worlds standard have their say.

Last week, 56 Internet leaders agreed to support a new standard called Moving Worlds, which is based a new version of the virtual reality modeling language known as VRML 2.0. This week, 2 of the companies on the list are already moving to implement the standard.

Moving Worlds is an open, platform-independent specification for 3D environments on the Net. The standard also provides features that let users create applications and content using Java and JavaScript. Users will be able to create behaviors, motions, and interactions such as opening a door, turning on a light, and opening a book in a 3D Web space. Moving Worlds allows 3D to be viewed on systems ranging from low-cost PCs to powerful 3D graphics workstations.

Netscape Communications is one of the chief promoters of Moving Worlds. The company announced this week that it will license Criterion Software's RenderWare 3D technology to enhance its Navigator 2.0 Live3D extensions.

Likewise, virtual reality software vendor VREAM this week unveiled its software for implementing Moving Worlds. VREAM's Unified Virtual Reality (UniVR) will be incorporated across VREAM's products, including its WIRL browser and the VRCreator Virtual Reality Authoring Tool, so that users will be able to create Moving Worlds Web pages and applications. UniVR will also be made available to third-party licensees.

Moving Worlds was developed through an open process led by Silicon Graphics with the support of Sony, WorldMaker, Visual Software, and VREAM, among others.