Internet

Universities put Nuremberg papers online

Documents from the Nuremberg trials are being published online through a joint project between Cornell University and Rutgers University. The documents, according to the universities, come from the personal papers and records of Gen. William J. Donovan, who acted as a special assistant to the U.S. Chief of Counsel during the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg. The Donovan collection, which includes nearly 150 bound volumes of transcripts and materials, was donated to the Cornell University School of Law Library in 1998. The "Rutgers Journal of Law & Religion" will post portions of the collection, which will appear in PDF format, to its Web site every six months in a section titled "The Nuremberg Project," the universities said. The site will also include scholarly commentary.

Documents from the Nuremberg trials are being published online through a joint project between Cornell University and Rutgers University. The documents, according to the universities, come from the personal papers and records of Gen. William J. Donovan, who acted as a special assistant to the U.S. Chief of Counsel during the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg.

The Donovan collection, which includes nearly 150 bound volumes of transcripts and materials, was donated to the Cornell University School of Law Library in 1998. The "Rutgers Journal of Law & Religion" will post portions of the collection, which will appear in PDF format, to its Web site every six months in a section titled "The Nuremberg Project," the universities said. The site will also include scholarly commentary.