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Twitter, PBS team up to stream Trump's inauguration

Social network will live-stream PBS NewsHour's six-hour coverage of Donald Trump officially becoming POTUS.

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President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration will be streamed on Twitter.

Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Twitter will live-stream President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration.

The social network said Thursday it's partnering with PBS NewsHour to broadcast the Jan. 20 event in Washington, DC. The six-hour coverage will be anchored by Judy Woodruff and feature several correspondents and analysts commenting on the swearing-in of Trump and soon-to-be Vice President Mike Pence on the steps of the US Capitol. Also set for coverage are speeches, the parade and Trump's official arrival at the White House.

While Twitter wasn't at the table with other tech companies at a recent meeting with Trump, the social network is remaining consistent with its plan to offer live coverage of major US political events including the Republican and Democratic conventions.

Inauguration coverage will be found at inauguration.twitter.com and @NewsHour.

Sara Just, NewsHour's executive producer, said in a statement that the transition of power to a new president is a "powerful moment" in America's democratic process.

"This year, it comes at a time when the country is embroiled in political discourse like we have rarely seen," she said. "Streaming public broadcasting's thoughtful coverage on Twitter will allow more Americans to experience the inauguration and join in discussion around it."

The inauration's organizer is planning a "much more poetic cadence than having a circus-like celebration that's a coronation," but which A-listers will show up is another matter.

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