Culture

'True' Apple fan weeps after being removed from iPhone 6 line

In Sydney, a student complains that many people in front of her were letting friends cut in line. She feared she wouldn't get a phone. But then she allegedly caused an obstruction.

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Apple staff in Sydney applauding the iPhone 6 launch. One Apple fanperson is not applauding. Seamus Byrne/CNET

As I stood in line this morning, I was sweating and making extremely strange high-pitched noises.

It had been quite a night. I hadn't slept. I could barely breathe.

Then a lovely woman in a corporate polo-shirt uniform finally paid attention to me. I uttered the magic words: "Grande nonfat latte and a chocolate croissant, please."

Sadly, one woman in Sydney, Australia, never got to utter her own passionate request to a corporate polo-shirt uniform. For police removed her from the iPhone 6 line outside an Apple store.

Giving her name only as Anna, she told The Sydney Morning Herald that she was upset over what people ahead of her in line were doing. They were, she said, letting their friends push in.

This is a deep moral no-no, akin to burping in someone's face in church or expectorating in the vicinity of the queen.

Anna said she had been in line for 24 hours. She said that instead of 80 people being in front of her, now there were 180. She blamed the store for not attempting to control what she saw as rampant pushing in. Why, for example, didn't they give people numbered cards? The fact that they didn't, said Anna, allowed profiteers to buccaneer.

A student, she had exams to go to. She feared that the additional people who she said had butted in would cause her not to be able to buy a phone. Well, she actually wanted two iPhone 6s.

She said that some merciless capitalists in front of her had offered to sell her their phones at an exorbitant premium. How could she afford this? It wasn't just.

Problems with the police ensued because she apparently kept wandering forward along the line, in her attempts to secure a phone for a better price. In the process, she was allegedly warned by police two or three times not to block the sidewalk.

In the end, police removed her and she left, hopeless and 6-less.

I have contacted Apple to ask whether it has any comment on Anna's story and will update, should I hear.

Characterizing herself as a true Apple fan, she told the Herald: "I just feel so excited by the iPhone, but the shop did nothing [to stop people pushing in]. It's a waste of my heart, waste of my love."

Anna, this may not be the last time your heart and your love will be wasted. Especially if you offer them to a gadget brand, rather than a human being.