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The politics of surfing

We all know where the presidential candidates are nearly all the time. But where do they head when it's just them, their computers, and their modems?

We all know where the presidential candidates are nearly all the time. But where do they head when it's just them, their computers, and their modems?

That's what Carol Pogash, executive editor of The Angle, set out to discover.

Pogash tracked down the candidates' favorite Web sites for her daily essay, which will appear Friday. It turns out that candidates did have their favorite places on the Internet, or at least they said they did, after some journalistic prodding. "I don't know if they surf, but they certainly weren't going to admit they don't surf," Pogash said.

Netizens may have doubted that Bob Dole's ever really been on the Net, especially after hearing him flub the name of his own Web site during the first presidential debate, and they shouldn't have. "It's very clear he does know something about the Net," Pogash said.

Sure, he mentioned his own Web site, Dole/Kemp '96, as one of his favorites. But Pogash was pleased that he also mentioned the Web site of another member of his family: that of his dog, Leader.

First Dog "is really very funny," Pogash said. It clearly proves that "Dole does have [a sense of] humor."

But Clinton? Well, it's an election year and he is the leader of the free world, so it was understandable that his people were "cautious." They said he really doesn't have a favorite but is very pleased with the White House home page. What a surprise.

Not to be outdone, Vice President Al Gore as well as Republican vice presidential candidate Jack Kemp also picked sites that surely would pass through even the strictest Web filters. (Kemp listed only the Dole/Kemp site.)

In fact, none of the candidates Pogash interviewed from all the political parties revealed any huge surprises.

Therefore, in keeping with The Angle's tone, the staff decided to "fill in their missing bookmarks" with "the sites we're sure they really like but wouldn't tell you about, at least not during the campaign."