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Technology put to the Olympic test

A range of technologies will be put to the test at the Winter Olympics, from Web coverage for fans who can't be there to devices that ensure accurate results for participants.

Athletes won't be the only ones working hard as the Winter Olympic Games open Friday. A wide range of technologies will be put to the test, from Web coverage for fans who can't be at the Games to devices that ensure accurate results for those participating.
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Olympics and the Web: What's left?
Jarvis Mak, senior analyst, NetRatings
A faster, leaner Olympics online
High-speed results from events and a more favorable time schedule will greet U.S. visitors at Olympics sites, but much of the information is designed to send viewers to their televisions.
February 8, 2002 
Biathletes get wireless weapon in Games
A transponder on a biathlete's ankle will be able to send a signal describing his or her location, information the coach can use to advise the Olympian.
February 8, 2002 
Olympics: A cell phone nirvana?
Three years and countless dollars have been devoted to turning a Utah dead zone into a cell phone caller's utopia, but some say the carriers may not be able to deliver.
February 8, 2002 
Tech partners go for Olympic gold
This year's Winter Olympics will be the first without IBM, which during most of its 40-year relationship with the games provided the bulk of tech and support services.
February 7, 2002 
previous coverage
Olympics tickets are hot auction items
Eager Olympics fans turn to online auctions for everything from $3,500 hotel packages to $1.99 stamps and pins.
January 28, 2002 
Bidding for Olympic torches lights up eBay
Sports fans who want a piece of the Olympic flame are paying red-hot prices on eBay, as people who participated in the relay heading toward Salt Lake City put their torches up for bid.
January 28, 2002