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Sun's WorkShop is Java 101

Sun Microsystems announces pricing and availability for tools that it says will allow developers to create, compile, and publish Java applications easily.

Sun Microsystems today announced pricing and availability for tools that it says will allow developers to create, compile, and publish Java applications easily.

Called Java WorkShop, the set of tools is an environment for creating Java applications. "This is the only development environment that basically integrates the development process with the Web," said Larry Weber, vice president and general manager of Sun's developer products group.

The workshop was designed to allow even novice users to build Java applications, according to Weber.

Sun also announced a series of object-related cross-licensing agreements with IBM, designed to make it easier for programmers to build intranet applications linked to existing client-server systems.

IBM will license Sun's Java client connectivity tool, Joe, for inclusion in its tool lineup, and is readying a port of its CICS transaction processing middleware for Sun's Solaris operating system, and will provide class libraries to allow Java programmers to access CICS.

In return, Sun is licensing from IBM class libraries and interfaces to IBM's MQSeries messaging middleware.

Java WorkShop will be available for download for a free 30-day trial beginning Friday. The product will be widely available on September 12 for a promotional retail price of $99 until December 31, after which the price will be $295.

In a related announcement, Sun said it is making an early access version of its NEO 2.0 object request broker available to developers. NEO links OLE, Java, and client-server applications to intranet and Internet services. The software is expected to ship early next year.

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