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Disney CEO drops Han Solo, 'Star Wars: The Last Jedi' hints

We get a peek under the shroud of mystery surrounding the next two Star Wars films. CEO Bob Iger also offers fans new hope about movies beyond Episode IX.

Disney CEO Bob Iger speaks at USC.

Video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

Disney has a talent for keeping the details of its Star Wars movies well under wraps, but CEO Bob Iger was willing to share some tidbits of information Thursday.

During a talk at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, Iger covered topics ranging from the standalone Han Solo movie to "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" to the future of Star Wars films.

Iger says the young Han Solo movie will cover the future smuggler's life from age 18 to 24, according to the Hollywood Reporter, It will detail how he gets his name, meets best bud Chewbacca and finds his iconic ship, the Millennium Falcon.

The Han Solo movie is due out in 2018 with Alden Ehrenreich stepping into the role made famous by Harrison Ford.

Iger says "The Last Jedi," set to open in December, will not be changed in light of star Carrie Fisher's death in late 2016. Fisher's character, Princess Leia, appears throughout the movie.

"Her performance, which we're really pleased with, remains as it was in VIII," Iger said. He also said Disney is not going to use digital re-creations of Fisher, even though technology makes it possible.

Disney already has a plan that includes Episode IX, the follow-up to "The Last Jedi," but the company has its sights set deep into the future. Iger revealed Disney is in early talks about what he describes as "another decade and a half of Star Wars stories."

This long-term look is good news for Star Wars fans eager to follow an ongoing story line. USC's Marshall School of Business posted the talk on streaming site Periscope.

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