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Small companies get the ball rolling

A News.com reader writes that if the high-tech industry is going to get back on its feet, the small, innovative companies will be the ones providing a lot of the market for the larger ones.

     

      
    Small companies get the ball rolling

    In response to the July 29 column by Robert Von Goeben, "Selling?s a pain but it?s all that matters":

    Just wanted to tell you that I enjoyed your article on selling by small, private and/or start-up companies. I am the head of a bi-coastal sales and business development consulting company based in New York City that focuses on small high-tech companies and start-ups. With over 25 years in the industry and three years as an independent, I think that your words could not be any more correct. Having spent almost every other week in the Valley over the better part of the last decade I have had the opportunity to see things rise and crash with a front row seat.

    Unfortunately, I think that there is another problem that most small companies face these days. The two- or three-year hiatus that companies took from pursuing revenue and focusing on customer/visitor acquisition hurt more than the investors who financed these endeavors. It also created a class of sales and sales management that is inexperienced in how to target, cold call, penetrate and negotiate with a Fortune 50 company. It would be very helpful to a number of these early-stage companies to understand Sales 101 basics and, in the case of very small companies, for everyone to understand them.

    In a company of 50 or less, almost everyone, from the receptionist to engineers to the CFO--if they have one--will play some part in the sales cycle. I think that some of the better VCs know this and some do provide guidance. As to the companies that do not understand these things, not only will their sales cycles be painfully long, most of their sales will never materialize.

    Sorry if I've preached to the choir here, but if the high-tech industry is going to get back on its feet, the small, innovative companies will still be the ones providing a lot of the market for the larger established ones. Someone has to sell something to get all this started.

    Michael Cardosa
    SoftBroker, Inc.
    New York, N.Y.