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Tech Industry

Rising challenges in open source

Hackers are getting their hands on Linux code, and Oracle now has its nose in the Red Hat tent.

The popularity of open-source software is attracting the unwanted attention of software miscreants and the encroachment of software giant Oracle on Red Hat's turf.

Veteran developer Alan Cox cautions that hackers are hard at work and that many projects are far from secure.
October 26, 2006

The candidate is the Community Development and Distribution License, used to govern Solaris, CEO says.
October 26, 2006

Second-round investment will fund continued technology development and expanded sales to corporate customers.
October 26, 2006

Announcement marks the first time a major computing company with Linux ties will compete directly with the Linux seller.
October 25, 2006

roundup Nipping at the heels of Microsoft's IE 7, the open-source browser update puts a premium on security.
October 24, 2006

Free, hobbyist version of Linux offers Xen virtualization features, including a graphical administration tool.
October 24, 2006

blog Redmond enlists John Lam, the software developer behind RubyCLR, open-source software for writing .Net applications.
October 24, 2006

Sun is "on plan" to make Java open source. Meanwhile, it looks to make OpenSolaris for specialized hardware devices.
October 23, 2006

The European Commission is committing big bucks to a consortium examining the quality of open-source code.
October 23, 2006

previous coverage

Oracle could benefit from offering its own Linux, according to Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth.
October 21, 2006

The company is also working on 64-bit versions of Flash, although there is no set release date.
October 19, 2006

Software seller OpenLogic says it will indemnify buyers against legal action connected with its open-source products.
October 17, 2006