CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Sci-Tech

Rain of fire on the surface of the sun

Footage captured during a solar flare shows a loop of molten plasma raining down like some sort of fiery wrath.

(Screenshot by Michelle Starr/CNET Australia)

Footage captured during a solar flare shows a loop of molten plasma raining down like some sort of fiery wrath.

There's something so awe-inspiringly beautiful about this.

On 19 July last year, a rare coronal mass ejection, or solar flare, occurred. Usually, according to NASA, a solar flare conforms to at least one of three things: a normal solar flare; a CME, that is, an eruption of plasma; or sometimes a flare involving hot plasma moving along the invisible magnetic field lines around the sun.

This one did all three.

The solar flare erupted, shooting plasma into space. Then, once the plasma was away from the surface of the sun in the sun's corona, it began to cool, falling back down to the surface in a stunning display known as coronal rain, following the paths described by the sun's usually invisible magnetic fields.

The below video was captured at a rate of one frame every 12 seconds by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and is shown here at a sped-up rate, where one second is about six minutes, covering a time span of about nine and a half hours.

If it wouldn't result in screamingly painful, fiery death, we imagine that the sun would be an amazing place to visit.

Stay tuned in to the NASA Goddard Space Center as we move closer toward this year's solar maximum.