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Preserving the Web fossil record

All those who say that tech heads don't take breaks should use their wagging tongues to scrape the mossy bottom of this week's rumor barrel. Judging from the echo bouncing around its hollow depths, every geek was miles away from a computer this weekend, stretching the three-day weekend into four or five. Even I took a breather from my hectic schedule.

All those who say that tech heads don't take breaks should use their wagging tongues to scrape the mossy bottom of this week's rumor barrel. Judging from the echo bouncing around its hollow depths, every geek was miles away from a computer this weekend, stretching the three-day weekend into four or five. Even I took a breather from my hectic schedule.

I was perhaps the only person on the continent not to see that dino-sequel, but I did see something better. The good-natured "Lost Duck" hack of the Lost World Web site is now extinct, but something has survived, and a leading member of the Skintelligentsia has generously passed it along for your perusal.

Since my news brethren reported the alteration yesterday, I've scratched my head about the perpetrators' identities. Nothing conclusive so far, but certain members of the press can't help but drop hints that perhaps they know something more.

Considering the fluffiness of the hack--equalled only by the fluffiness of this column--my guess is that Universal Pictures orchestrated the stunt to garner some oh-so-hip Web publicity. If my guess is correct, that would make me a big fat sucker.

Also surviving are pesky rumors about networking vendor Fore Systems, despite CEO Eric Cooper's flat-out denial of a possible acquisition. While velociraptors rumbled through dark theaters this weekend, Fore investors dialed the hotline and grumbled that the company should have sold out while the gettin' was good. Fore stock closed yesterday at 16-5/8.

I've peeked under the sheets several times to tell you which Web sites don't use their own goods (Lotus uses O'Reilly's Website Professional, for example) nor the goods of their close technology buddies (i.e., Yahoo doesn't use Netscape servers). This isn't rocket science, folks. Go to Netcraft's server survey site and have a look. More interesting is that certain marketeers are catching on. Up at Rancho Redmondo, the smug 'Softies have posted this message on the microsoft.com FAQ page:

"Seven days a week, 24 hours a day, Microsoft servers deliver our popular Web site to millions of visitors worldwide. And the software? We use only the best: software by Microsoft!" Before you take your next long weekend, gather all rumors and send them to me.