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Photos: In step with tomorrow's robots

Robots that dance, drum and taste show off at Prototype Robot Exhibition at Aichi World Expo in Japan.

    Robots in step

    Robot developers showed off more than 60 of their latest creations at the Prototype Robot Exhibition at Aichi World Expo, which started June 9 and ends June 19, in Nagakute, Japan. The robots aren't quite ready for everyday use--but they may offer a glimpse of what we'll be taking for granted someday.

    Here, a man dances with two "partner ballroom dance robots," or PBDRs, created by the robotic venture Nomura Unison.

    Credit: Junko Kimura/Getty Images

    robot ballet

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    Robots in step

    And now the news, with "Actroid Repliee." Osaka University professor Hiroshi Ishiguro looks after this newscaster robot, which relies on "air servo actuators" to move its arms, head and torso smoothly.

    Credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/Agence France Presse

    news robot

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    Robots in step

    The powered HAL-5 (hybrid assistive leg) "robot suit" can assist workers lifting heavy loads and help people with disabilities climb stairs.

    Credit: Yoshikazo Tsuno/Agence France Presse

    robosuit

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    Robots in step

    During a demonstration, a woman places an apple in the hand of NEC's "optical-tongue robot," which can measure the fruit's sugar content. This robot scans the ingredients of food and then checks the eater's medical profiles to make sure it is healthy.

    Credit: Junko Kimura/Getty Images

    sweet taster

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    Robots in step

    ACM-R5 is designed to look for victims trapped in buildings. The snake-like robot has a camera on its front and can run for about 30 minutes at a time, slithering into spots where rescue workers wouldn't be able to fit.

    Credit: Junko Kimura/Getty Images

    robot snake

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    Robots in step

    Robot HRP-2 plays a traditional Japanese drum. He's mimicking specific motions captured from a master drummer.

    Credit: Yoshikazo Tsuno/Agence France Presseges

    robodrummer

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