Tech Industry

Oracle adds Linux e-commerce software to lineup

The database software giant is set to ship a new Linux-based version of its application server software that helps businesses create e-commerce Web sites.

Oracle is shipping new e-commerce software for the Linux operating system.

The database software giant today will ship a new Linux-based version of its application server software that helps businesses create e-commerce Web sites. The software processes Web transactions and serves as a traffic cop between a Web browser and a back-end database.

Like rival software makers IBM, the Sun-Netscape Alliance, Sybase and Informix, Oracle has been adding support for Linux throughout its product family. Oracle had previously released Linux versions of its business software, such as financial, human resources and customer service applications, as well as of its 8i database.

As previously reported, Oracle's new application server offers several new features, including caching, which speeds the delivery of Web content to an Internet surfer. It also includes data analysis tools to help managers and executives make better business decisions.

Oracle has already released the new version of the application server for the Unix operating system and is a few weeks away from shipping a version for Windows, said Bob Shimp, an Oracle marketing director.

The company today also announced new marketing agreements with Linux sellers Caldera, VA Linux Systems, TurboLinux and SuSE. The Linux firms will offer their customers a free CD containing sample versions of Oracle's database and application server for Linux.

Oracle prices its software based on a power unit rating which measures overall server performance. The Oracle application server enterprise edition costs $30 per power unit, while the standard edition costs $5 per power unit. The wireless edition costs $150 per power unit or $95 per user.

For Oracle, 1 MHz on an Intel processor equals 1 power unit. For RISC processors, 1 MHz equals 1.5 power units, a company spokeswoman said. A "power unit" is Oracle's method for determining the size and power of server processors.