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Obama reportedly digs at Trump and his Twitter account

Commentary: In an interview in Manhattan, the president muses that he had his own way of dealing with things, according to the New York Post.

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Now that he's on the pay-me-a-lot-of-money-for-a-few-jokes circuit, Barack Obama can relax.

Being president for eight years can age the mind and body. Now, he can kick back and occasionally kick out at those for whom he may not have complete respect.

On Thursday, Obama was interviewed in a Manhattan hotel by presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. This wasn't quite a presidential affair. It was all to entertain A&E's advertisers.

Still, as the New York Post reports, Goodwin asked about Obama's presidential times. How, for example, did he deal with moments of frustration -- of which there were surely many?

"For starters, by not having a Twitter account," replied Obama.

What could he have meant, if not a dig at the First Twitterer, Donald Trump? Our current president has turned his Twitter account into a political art form, using it to reveal, cajole, threaten and defend.

Neither A&E nor the White House immediately responded to a request for comment. Trump did, however, offer a Friday morning retweet. It was of a thought emerging from what seems to be his favorite political forum -- "Fox and Friends."

The tweet said: "Former President Obama's $400K Wall Street speech stuns liberal base; Sen. Warren saying she 'was troubled by that.'"

The reference might just have been to Obama's reported $400,000 fee for speaking to Wall Street investment bank, Cantor Fitzgerald. Then again, the Post suggested he was getting another $400,000 for his interview with Goodwin.

Technically, of course, Obama did have a Twitter account -- the @POTUS account, which Trump doesn't use for his personal tweets. This, though, Obama didn't use to besmirch or belittle. It was more of a statesmanlike entity.

Perhaps, though, President Trump might now think twice about his new tax plan. After all, it appears to benefit many of the very wealthiest. Does he really want President Obama -- now a high roller himself -- to benefit too?

Perhaps he could make an exception to the plan for former presidents.

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