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NRA offers Kim Kardashian heartfelt sarcasm after armed robbery

Technically Incorrect: On Twitter, the National Rifle Association mocks the celebrity, possibly for her support for some level of gun control.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


The NRA doesn't seem sympathetic to Kardashian after her ordeal.

RB/Bauer-Griffin, GC Images

When you've just been held up by armed robbers, you might hope for a little sympathy.

It can't have been too easy for Kim Kardashian to have been confronted by five miscreants dressed as policemen in her rented Paris apartment.

She was reportedly locked in a bathroom, had millions of dollars of jewelry stolen, as well as two of her phones.

One might imagine that she would have been offered sympathy. Instead, many on Twitter offered suspicion and even derision.

And then there was the National Rifle Association.

It took its own typically thoughtful angle to the whole thing.

On Twitter, the NRA referenced Kardashian specifically: "Wait, criminals held @KimKardashian at gunpoint in Paris? How is that possible? Does anyone know if they passed a background check first?"

This shot was followed by another tweet: "It's shocking that these criminals did not subject themselves to Paris' strict #guncontrol laws before committing this awful crime."

There's a certain level of sincere sympathy that seems missing in these tweets.

You might believe the NRA is a defender of one of the last bastions of American freedom. Or you might believe that it's a congregation of cynical, asinine folks with severe dandruff, whose only interest lies in scaring Americans into owning as many guns as possible.

The organization doesn't always comment on every gun-related incident. It sometimes remains silent, for example only offering comment two days after the Orlando massacre. Why target Kardashian so quickly?

It could be because she declared herself a Hillary Clinton supporter.

Some believe that the Democratic nominee wants to enact draconian gun control laws, as opposed to what others might describe as the first sane steps to prevent the wrong people -- such as those on the no-fly list -- from buying guns.

It could also be because Kardashian actually took to Twitter to support a little gun control. In June, she offered: "So sad! The senate voted against background checks being needed to buy guns. So terrorists on fbi's wanted lists can legally still buy guns."

Kardashian's rep didn't immediately respond to a request for comment. Naturally, not everyone on Twitter has been sympathetic to the NRA's emission.

Harry Barnes, for example, mused: "The NRA are mocking French gun laws, as though they don't work. 260:1 USA/France death ratio to guns. Says enough."

Sadly, far too many people on Twitter never believe they've said enough.