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Mobile

Nobody raising hands for hands-free

A survey from Jupiter Research released Thursday concludes that more than 60 percent of all wireless phone users still prefer to dial using their fingers rather than using voice-recognition software. The survey also found just 18 percent of those between ages 18 and 34, among the earliest adopters of the latest mobile technologies, are using voice commands to operate their phones. Voice commands are being proposed by the wireless industry as a way for cell phone users to operate a phone safely while driving. A growing number of states have passed laws against so-called talking while driving.

A survey from Jupiter Research released Thursday concludes that more than 60 percent of all wireless phone users still prefer to dial using their fingers rather than using voice-recognition software.

The survey also found just 18 percent of those between ages 18 and 34, among the earliest adopters of the latest mobile technologies, are using voice commands to operate their phones. Voice commands are being proposed by the wireless industry as a way for cell phone users to operate a phone safely while driving. A growing number of states have passed laws against so-called talking while driving.