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Mozilla upgrades browser beta

By Matthew Broersma Mozilla.org has released the latest test version of its open-source browser suite. Mozilla 0.9.6 fixes several bugs and adds features such as page icons in the location bar and cross-platform support for some image formats. An improved search feature lets people highlight any word on a page and find matches via a right-click menu. Although the browser is still in beta form, it is used widely by the development community. Its page-rendering engine, Gecko, is used as the core of browsers such as the Linux browser Galeon, from the open-source development project GNOME. AOL Time Warner's Netscape 6 also is based on Mozilla, although that browser was roundly criticized for its quality. When Mozilla reaches its long-delayed 1.0 release, it will be used as the default browser by Red Hat, distributor of the most popular Linux distribution. That release is now expected in April 2002, according to Mozilla's Web site. Staff writer Matthew Broersma reported from London.

By Matthew Broersma

Mozilla.org has released the latest test version of its open-source browser suite. Mozilla 0.9.6 fixes several bugs and adds features such as page icons in the location bar and cross-platform support for some image formats. An improved search feature lets people highlight any word on a page and find matches via a right-click menu.

Although the browser is still in beta form, it is used widely by the development community. Its page-rendering engine, Gecko, is used as the core of browsers such as the Linux browser Galeon, from the open-source development project GNOME. AOL Time Warner's Netscape 6 also is based on Mozilla, although that browser was roundly criticized for its quality. When Mozilla reaches its long-delayed 1.0 release, it will be used as the default browser by Red Hat, distributor of the most popular Linux distribution. That release is now expected in April 2002, according to Mozilla's Web site.

Staff writer Matthew Broersma reported from London.