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Online game encourages you to punch out Nazis

A new browser-based game lets you smack down Richard Spencer, Milo Yiannopolous and Adolf Hitler.

Super Deluxe

Since being punched in the face while showing off his "Pepe the Frog" pin, "alt-right" leader Richard Spencer has stirred the imagination of the web.

A video of the pasting, which occurred during the inauguration celebrations for US President Donald Trump, has already inspired memes and a comic song. Now, Super Deluxe has created a browser- and mobile-based video game of the incident.

In Punch a Nazi, gamers are encouraged to coldcock Spencer and Breitbart writer Milo Yiannopoulos. They also get a chance to deck Adolf Hitler himself.

CNET reached out to Spencer and Yiannopoulos but did not immediately receive a response.

The game is designed in the style of NES classic Mike Tyson's Punch Out, although your opponents won't punch back. To play, you get a code from the desktop version of the site and plug it into your phone to connect the two devices. After that, make jabbing motions with while holding the phone and you'll do some on-screen damage.

Spencer, a Trump supporter, coined the term "alt-right," which refers to a loose group of white supremacists, white nationalists and new-Nazis. (Spencer rejected the late "white supremacist" in an interview with Al Jazeera last month though he does call for a white European "ethno-state.")

Milo Yiannopoulos rejected the claims that he's a member of the alt-right in an interview last September, but he remains a controversial figure. A scheduled appearance at UC Berkley erupted in violence earlier this week. Yiannopolous was banned from Twitter after he was accused of inciting hatred against "Ghostbusters" star Leslie Jones.

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