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Microsoft's crown jewels

Antitrust trials and internal memos leaked to the Web give the first glimpse of how Microsoft maintains a hammerlock on software APIs, and paint Linux and Java as its most serious threats yet.

 


Antitrust trials and internal memos leaked to the Web give the first glimpse of how Redmond maintains a hammerlock on APIs, and paint Java and Linux as the giant's most serious threats yet.

  By News.com staff
  December 2, 1998, 4 a.m. PT

Platform ploys in the public eye
The first glimpse of how Microsoft maintains a hammerlock on software application interfaces also paints Linux and Java as its most serious threats.

Jinxed by Java
The programming language presents one of the most viable ways for the industry to grow outside Redmond's purview.

Linux--Achilles' heel?
Simple Linux could steal users from Microsoft's bloated network operating system.

The ones that got away
For all its wins, a slew of the giant's past platform domination attempts have bitten the dust.

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"Microsoft has been more influential as a de facto standard setter than most standards organizations have been."
--Dwight Davis, analyst with Summit Strategies

 

 

The strategy was to lock Java developers into Windows, in what one executive called a "Trojan horse."