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Malaysia enters 2000 sans bugs

It is all-systems go during the rollover to Jan. 1, 2000, the Y2K operations center at the Energy Communications and Multimedia Ministry reports.

KUALA LUMPUR--Malaysia entered year 2000 with no report of disruptions caused by the so-called millennium bug computer problem, which has caused months of anxiety and cost the various sectors to spend 1.85 billion ringgit ($487 million) to avert Y2K glitches.

It was all-systems go during the rollover to Jan. 1, 2000, the Y2K operations center at the Energy Communications and Multimedia Ministry, which monitors computer systems of all the key sectors, reported early today.

Tenaga Nasional Berhad reported Back to Year 2000 Index Page no power supply disruption in the first 15 minutes into the new year.

Because of the time difference, Malaysia, with elaborate preparations to tackle the much-touted Y2K problem, benefited from the few hours before midnight by learning that computer systems in New Zealand, the first industrialized nation to usher in the new millennium, were spared from any Y2K problem.

The millennium bug was anticipated to affect computer systems in several critical sectors: energy, communications, water supply, banking, insurance and the stock market, transportation, health, oil and gas, sewage, and government.

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